[ad_1]

Tesco has almost doubled the price of a tin of Heinz tomato soup, leading to accusations of double standards and ‘price gouging’.

The UK’s biggest grocer now charges £1.70 for a 400g tin of the nation-favourite, a 79 per cent increase from last summer. Cash-strapped shoppers, already grappling with soaring energy and mortgage bills, were hit with another 21 per cent increase this week, industry data shows.

Figures from Assosia, seen by the Mail, reveal the price of a tin of the American giant’s Cream Of Tomato Soup at Tesco has risen from just 95p since June.

A week ago the cost stood at £1.40, but in another devastating blow to shoppers a tin now costs a fifth, or 30p, more.

The cost of a 400g tin of Heinz Cream of Tomato Soup has ballooned by 79 per cent at Tesco since June 2022

The cost of a 400g tin of Heinz Cream of Tomato Soup has ballooned by 79 per cent at Tesco since June 2022

The news comes just six months after Tesco pledged to not pass on 'unjustifiable' cost hikes to customers

The news comes just six months after Tesco pledged to not pass on ‘unjustifiable’ cost hikes to customers 

It comes just six months after Tesco pledged to stand by squeezed consumers and not pass on ‘unjustifiable’ price increases, leading to a bitter dispute with Heinz. Tesco was praised for standing firm against the giant, even briefly refusing to stock its products.

Responding to the price hikes, a senior industry source said: ‘To raise prices after shouting about holding Heinz to account stinks of double standards.

‘With money tight for so many right now what customers really value is consistency and transparency.’

The increases come as the UK faces its biggest drop in living standards on record as the surging cost of living eats into people’s wages.

Official forecaster, the Office for Budget Responsibility, said household incomes will dive by seven per cent by 2024.

The price of a weekly shop is 14.4 per cent higher than a year ago and households are hunting for bargains, with a growing shift to own label products and the discount grocers Aldi and Lidl.

Meanwhile, MailOnline uncovered last week that supermarkets have been quietly increasing prices of ready meals and microwave dishes by up to 50 per cent over last year 

And earlier this month, the Mail revealed how fresh food prices had rocketed by 15 per cent – as retailers warned there was no sign the boom was going to slow down any time soon.  

Tesco, which controls more than a quarter of the UK’s grocery market, has now been accused of turning its back on the pledge made in June to ‘not pass on unjustifiable price increases’ to shoppers.

The business promised a ‘laser-focus’ on keeping the cost of the weekly shop in check and won praise for standing firm against the £43 billion US conglomerate.

And yesterday chief executive Ken Murphy said: ‘We are battling to keep prices down for customers. And it’s an ongoing and ongoing kind of struggle, but we’re doing our best.’

Ken Murphy, Tesco's chief executive, has insisted the retail giant is  'battling' to keep prices down for customers

Ken Murphy, Tesco’s chief executive, has insisted the retail giant is  ‘battling’ to keep prices down for customers 

Food experts previously blamed the rising costs of tomatoes as well as soaring energy bills and a shortage of people in Wigan available to work in Heinz’s British factory for rises in tomato soup cans. 

Tesco’s soup-can price hikes bring it in line with major rivals Sainsbury’s and Asda, and slightly above Morrisons.

See also  Iran vs USA - World Cup 2022: Live score, team news and updates

But the shocking figures led to allegations of ‘profiteering’. 

Helen Dewdney, The Complaining Cow consumer champion, said there appears to be no good reason for the increases. She said: ‘If Tesco were only inflating prices to incur costs they were facing then surely this would not be the case.

‘Not one thing in the chain has gone up by 78 per cent, so how is putting up the cost of a tin of soup 78 per cent over six months months appropriate and reflective of costs? Inflation is high but it’s not at 78 per cent. I think this reflects very badly on Tesco and shows the importance of comparing prices across supermarkets if you can.’

Tory MP Craig Mackinlay said: ‘It is becoming increasingly clear that profiteering is at large in our High Streets and superstores with 100pc price rises across many run-of-the-mill items. I have the benefit of my father, aged 88, a retired retailer, who is a super sleuth on these matters.

Food experts previously warned the soaring costs of the soup cans was due to tomato prices ballooning and a shortage of staff working at a Heinz factory in Wigan

Food experts previously warned the soaring costs of the soup cans was due to tomato prices ballooning and a shortage of staff working at a Heinz factory in Wigan 

‘Obviously capitalism and profits are the currency that makes our economy go round and I wouldn’t want it any other way but some of the price gouging on basic products is even putting what we’ve seen going on with forecourt fuel costs look like small beer. I’d recommend some serious shopping around by consumers and voting with wallets and purses.’

And Sue Davies, Which? Head of Food Policy, said: ‘Some of the nation’s favourite branded foods have soared in price by a shocking amount amid the cost of living crisis. These hikes show why it is so important for retailers to provide people with a choice of product ranges.

‘Supermarkets can make a real difference to hard-hit households by ensuring everyone has easy access to basic, affordable food lines at a store near them, particularly in areas where people are most in need.

‘Promotions should be targeted at those most likely to be struggling and pricing should be more transparent so shoppers can easily compare products and get the best value.’

Revealed: How supermarkets have been quietly increasing prices of ready meals and microwave dishes by up to 50% over last year… with Asda chicken hot pot soaring 250% from 85p to £3

by NATASHA ANDERSON FOR MAILONLINE 

Supermarkets have been quietly raising the price of ready meals and convenience foods by much as 50 per cent over the last year – with one Asda microwave dish rocketing by more than 250 per cent.  

Shoppers are spending more on snack foods and ready made meals as the UK’s cost of living crisis saw food inflation jump to a record 13.3 per cent last month.

The prices of convenience foods have surged at most popular grocers – including Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Aldi and Morrisons – over the last year, according to data collected by trolley.co.uk. 

Products with the most significant price hikes saw increases of between 13.4 and 50 per cents from December 2021 to December 2022. 

Skyrocketing food prices come many shoppers are facing the prospect of a tighter squeeze in 2023, with higher taxes and mortgage rates, scaled-back government support on household energy bills and UK inflation running at 10.7 per cent.

Tesco

The five ready meals that saw the highest price rise at Tesco were all Charlie Bigham’s products.

The grocer raised the price of three products from the London-based food manufacturer by 18.8 per cent over the last year.

The Chicken Tikka Masala & Pilau Rice, Thai Red Curry and Spanish Chicken & Roasted Potatoes meals are now £9.50 each – a £1.50 increase since December 2021.

The store is also selling Charlie Bigham’s Fish Pie and Cottage Pie for £9.50. The pies previously sold for £8.25, meaning they increased in price by 15.2 per cent last year.

The store is also selling Charlie Bigham's Fish Pie and Cottage Pie for £9.50

The pies previously sold for £8.25, meaning they increased in price by 15.2 per cent last year

The store is also selling Charlie Bigham’s Fish Pie and Cottage Pie for £9.50. The pies previously sold for £8.25, meaning they increased in price by 15.2 per cent last year

Sainsbury’s

Sainsbury’s raised the price of its Slow Cooked British Pork Ribs Smokey BBQ Sauce ready meal by nearly 50 per cent.

The two-serving product is now selling for £6.25, a £2.00 – or 47.1 per cent – increase since 2021.

The grocer’s Slow Cooked British Pork Ribs with Spicy Firecracker Glaze, which also serves two, shot up by £1.50 to £6.25. 

Sainsbury’s – which also sells Charlie Bigham’s products – increased the prices on three of the manufacturer’s ready meals. 

The cost of the Charlie Bigham’s Cottage Pie (325g), Cottage Pie (650g) and Moussaka for 2 rose by 33.3 per cent, 22.6 per cent and 20.6 per cent, respectively.

Sainsbury's Slow Cooked British Pork Ribs with Spicy Firecracker Glaze, which also serves two, shot up by £1.50 to £6.25

Sainsbury’s Slow Cooked British Pork Ribs with Spicy Firecracker Glaze, which also serves two, shot up by £1.50 to £6.25

Asda

The most shocking price rises were found at Asda, which increased the selling point for its Chicken Hotpot ready meal from £0.85 to £3.00.

The product saw a 252.9 per cent price rise over the course of a year.

Asda also rose the price of its Chicken Tikka Masala, Chicken Jalfrezi and Chicken Bhuna ready meals by 50 per cent. The products are now being sold for £3.75 each.

The supermarket’s Indian Chicken Korma and Chicken Tikka Masala Meal for 2 is now sold for £8.25. Last year, it was 17.9 per cent less at £7 per item.

The most shocking price rises were found at Asda, which increased the selling point for its Chicken Hotpot ready meal from £0.85 to £3.00. The product saw a 252.9 per cent price rise over the course of a year

The most shocking price rises were found at Asda, which increased the selling point for its Chicken Hotpot ready meal from £0.85 to £3.00. The product saw a 252.9 per cent price rise over the course of a year

The supermarket's Indian Chicken Korma and Chicken Tikka Masala Meal for 2 is now sold for £8.25. Last year, it was 17.9 per cent less at £7 per item

The supermarket’s Indian Chicken Korma and Chicken Tikka Masala Meal for 2 is now sold for £8.25. Last year, it was 17.9 per cent less at £7 per item

Aldi

Aldi raised the prices of several popular snacks over the last year from pies to dahl and bread sauce.

The supermarket’s largest price hike was that of its Specially Selected Rich & Delicious 6 Steak & Ale 6 Chicken & Ham Mini Pies Topped With Buttery Golden Puff Pastry.

The product’s price point ballooned by 33.4 per cent to £3.99 between December 2021 and last month.

Meanwhile the budget supermarket’s own Aldi Specially Selected Specially Selected Mini Beef Wellingtons saw an 80p – or 25.1 per cent – rise from £3.19 to £3.99.

The Snacksters Big Stack and Specially Selected Bread Sauce saw price hikes of 20.1 per cent and 13.4 per cent, respectively.

See also  Jonathan Ross and his star-studded Hampstead Halloween party returns

Aldi’s Plant Menu Coconut & Apple Dhal also increased in price from £1.49 to £1.75.

Aldi's largest price hike was that of its Specially Selected Rich & Delicious 6 Steak & Ale 6 Chicken & Ham Mini Pies Topped With Buttery Golden Puff Pastry. The product's price point rose by 33.4 per cent to £3.99 between December 2021 and last month

Aldi’s largest price hike was that of its Specially Selected Rich & Delicious 6 Steak & Ale 6 Chicken & Ham Mini Pies Topped With Buttery Golden Puff Pastry. The product’s price point rose by 33.4 per cent to £3.99 between December 2021 and last month

Aldi Specially Selected Specially Selected Mini Beef Wellingtons saw an 80p - or 25.1 per cent - rise from £3.19 to £3.99.

Aldi's Plant Menu Coconut & Apple Dhal also increased in price from £1.49 to £1.75

Aldi Specially Selected Specially Selected Mini Beef Wellingtons saw an 80p – or 25.1 per cent – rise from £3.19 to £3.99. Aldi’s Plant Menu Coconut & Apple Dhal also increased in price from £1.49 to £1.75

The Snacksters Big Stack and Specially Selected Bread Sauce saw price hikes of 20.1 per cent and 13.4 per cent, respectively

Specially Selected Bread Sauce

The Snacksters Big Stack and Specially Selected Bread Sauce saw price hikes of 20.1 per cent and 13.4 per cent, respectively

Morrisons 

Like the other grocers carrying Charlie Bigham’s products, Morrisons also hiked up the prices of three items produced by the brand.

The Charlie Bigham’s Lasagne and Macaroni Cheese surged by 49.8 per cent. The Fish Pie increased by 35.6 per cent to £9.49.

Morrisons increased the price of its own Salmon Smoked Haddock & King Prawn Fish Pie. The product now sells for £6.99.

Last year, the pie was 39.8 per cent cheaper.

Like the other grocers carrying Charlie Bigham's products, Morrisons also hiked up the prices of three items produced by the brand

The Charlie Bigham's Lasagne and Macaroni Cheese surged by 49.8 per cent

The Charlie Bigham’s Lasagne and Macaroni Cheese surged by 49.8 per cent

The Charlie Bigham's Fish Pie increased by 35.6 per cent to £9.49

Morrisons also increased the price of its own Salmon Smoked Haddock & King Prawn Fish Pie

The Charlie Bigham’s Fish Pie increased by 35.6 per cent to £9.49. Morrisons also increased the price of its own Salmon Smoked Haddock & King Prawn Fish Pie

UK food prices soared to record rates in December, according to data from the British Retail Consortium (BRC).

Food inflation accelerated to 13.3 per cent in December after having been 12.4 per cent in November. 

The BRC claims December’s food inflation rate is the highest monthly rate on record since the firm began collecting data in 2005.

The three-month average food inflation rate was 12.5 per cent.  

But despite soaring food inflation, British households spent more than £12billion on groceries over Christmas – the highest amount on record, new figures show.

The total value of sales has risen because of the increasing cost of food and drink, rather than because people are spending more, according to Kantar’s monthly monitor.

In fact, the volume of sales was down by 1 per cent over December, compared with the same period last year, indicating that shoppers are facing a much more expensive grocery shop, Kantar said. 

Sales of stores’ own brands surged by 13.3 per cent last month, compared with a 4.7 per cent rise in branded lines.

Many retailers also increased their ranges of premium own-label products over Christmas, with sales of those lines growing by 10.2 per cent and hitting more than £700million in total for the first time.

Tesco’s Finest range came out on top in terms of sales, while Aldi and Lidl enjoyed significant growth in their premium own-labels.

Meanwhile, the supermarket giants continue to dominate spending for UK shoppers, with Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Morrisons accounting for more than two-thirds of all spending.

Aldi also held on to its title of fastest-growing grocer, enjoying a 27 per cent surge in year-on-year sales and taking its share of the market to 9.1 per cent, from 7.7 per cent this time last year.

[ad_2]

Source link