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Couple are called out for walking their dog as a heatwave strikes – as pet experts issue an urgent warning every Aussie needs to read: ‘Idiots’

  • Photo of couple walking dog in heatwave goes viral
  • Dog does not appear to have any protection on paws 
  • Don’t let your dog walk on hot sand, concrete or asphalt during heatwaves 
  • If you can’t put the back of your hand on the ground for 5 seconds, it’s too hot 

An furious Aussie has unleashed at a couple walking their dog in Bondi as a heatwave strikes Sydney with temperatures soaring past 30 degrees.

The image of the the couple walking the dog was shared to a community Facebook group, with the person who posted it calling them out for failing to provide adequate protection for the pooch’s paws.
Aussies are calling out a Bondi couple for walking their dog as temperatures soared past 30 degrees

Aussies are calling out a Bondi couple for walking their dog as temperatures soared past 30 degrees

‘If you’re going to walk your dog right now (middle of the day during 30+ degrees celsius), make sure to go barefoot in solidarity. These dogs crossed the hot road in visible pain,’ the poster wrote. 

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Many residents of the swanky beachside suburb were quick to call out the couple. 

‘Seriously what is wrong with people … that poor doggo will have bleeding paws,’ one said.

‘This makes me so angry & upset to see this, why are people so stupid,’ another questioned.

Another said: ‘It’s just so sad to see animals suffering.’

Pet owners have been warned not to let their pets walk on hot summer pavement as it can burn their paws on a very hot day. This picture was posted by the Melton Veterinary Clinic in Victoria in 2018

Pet owners have been warned not to let their pets walk on hot summer pavement as it can burn their paws on a very hot day. This picture was posted by the Melton Veterinary Clinic in Victoria in 2018

‘I hate seeing people walking dogs in this heat strolling along while they have shoes on, it gets me so angry poor little buggers getting dragged around in this heat,’ another weighed in.

‘Some people just don’t understand about how the doggos’ feet are burning on days like this,’ another raged, adding an angry red face emoji.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) says that dog paws are quite sensitive, especially to heat, and can easily burn on hot pavement or asphalt.

‘Avoid walking on hot sand, concrete, asphalt areas or any other areas where heat is reflected and there is no access to shade,’ the website says.

The RSPCA recommends using the ‘five second rule’ to test if the ground is too hot.

‘Place the back of your hand on the surface for five seconds and if it’s too hot for you, then it’s too hot for your dog.’

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The RSPCA advises pet owners to walk their dogs in the cool of the early morning or late evening during summer heatwaves.

Experts at the PDSA, the UK’s leading pet charity, say: ‘Not only will the pavement be too hot for their sensitive paws, going for walks in hot weather can cause them to dangerously overheat.

‘Dogs love to run around, which is why nearly three-quarters of heatstroke cases develop while exercising.

‘It can also be caused by simply sitting somewhere too warm, or being trapped somewhere hot, such as a car, conservatory or room without proper ventilation.

‘Instead of heading out, set up a shady spot in the garden or the house, ideally with a cooling breeze and make sure your pooch has access to plenty of water.

‘Though you might not take your cats for daily walks, encourage them to be inside in a cool area during the hottest part of the day.’

URGENT WARNING FOR PET OWNERS AMID BRUTAL HEATWAVE

The Animal Welfare League Queensland has warned pet owners to take precautions to keep their animals cool during the heatwave:

  • Never leave your animals in a vehicle – even with the windows open. A parked car is like an oven; temperatures can reach extreme levels quickly, leading to fatal heat stroke.
  • Pets dehydrate quickly – have plenty of fresh, clean water available. Also, make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful not to over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s scorching.
  • Know the symptoms of overheating in pets, including excessive panting or difficulty breathing, drooling, mild weakness, vomiting, or even collapse. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke.
  • If you can’t be home, seek alternative arrangements – ask your neighbour or a family member to mind your pet. If your pet is home alone, leaving the air-conditioning or fans on in the house will help keep pets cool.
  • Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool or at the beach – not all dogs are good swimmers. Instead, gradually introduce your pets to water, and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats.
  • Don’t let your pets linger on hot pavements – when the temperature is very high and is so close to the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly. In addition, their sensitive paw pads can burn, so keep dog walks during these times to a minimum.
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Consult your veterinarian immediately if you are concerned about your pet’s well-being. To report wildlife in distress, contact 1300 264 625.

 

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