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Aussie beaches being taken over by hugely popular cabanas – but not everyone is happy to see the tent explosion: ‘Wouldn’t even know what colour the sand is’

  • Social media users react to new sun safety trend covering Aussie beaches
  • Beach cabanas, namely Cool Cabanas are popping up all over the country
  • The open air tent has been seen from Sydney to Perth to Newcastle and Noosa 

A new sun safety product is sweeping beaches across Australia with many left wondering why beach cabanas are the hottest new summer product.

Many social media users have taken to TikTok in recent weeks asking if they missed the memo about Cool Cabanas, an open-air tent, a popular product throughout Europe.

The item has been popping up across the country but the Gold Coast and Perth appear to love them more than most.

In one clip @ashlillyandlimeswimwear posted a video of the tents all over the beach captioned with, ‘We didn’t get the colour memo’.

Another video by @viralqueenliv, showed off the array of colourful tents saying, ‘Cool Cabanas taking over the Gold Coast’.

While many wondered why Aussie beaches have morphed into looking like the sands of Spain, many were thrilled about the increase in sun safety.

‘Legit when we were at Noosa we were wondering how much money they’ve made because they were EVERYWHERE,’ one person wrote.

‘I don’t get it – people aren’t taking up more space than they normally would, they just have shade,’ a second commented.

‘You need to see Noosa’s main beach. Wouldn’t even know what colour the sand is. It’s covered with them,’ a third said.

‘It’s literally the best thing I own hahaha,’ commented a fourth to which the poster replied ‘Fact’.

Many social media users have taken to TikTok in recent weeks asking if they missed the memo about Cool Cabanas, an open-air tent, a popular product throughout Europe

Many social media users have taken to TikTok in recent weeks asking if they missed the memo about Cool Cabanas, an open-air tent, a popular product throughout Europe

While others thought the cabanas were a silly idea and ruined the aesthetic of Australian beaches, making Australian beaches look like tourist beaches throughout Europe

While others thought the cabanas were a silly idea and ruined the aesthetic of Australian beaches, making Australian beaches look like tourist beaches throughout Europe

Others thought the cabanas were a silly idea and ruined the aesthetic of Australian beaches.

‘So annoying when the whole beach is full of them though, they take up so much space,’ one person said.

‘I think they’re dumb, better off with something with sides,’ a second commented.

‘No sunny coast is being taken over,’ a third wrote.

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‘They suck. My home beach looks like a tent city. I wish they’d all go home,’ a fourth complained.

Social media users said they had seen the cabanas in Perth, Adelaide, Sydney, Newcastle and Noosa as the tents’ popularity is clear to see.

Cool Cabanas range in price from $189 to $249, with cheaper alternatives to the item seen at stores such as Kmart.

Social media users said they had seen the cabanas in Perth, Adelaide, Sydney, Newcastle and Noosa as the tent's popularity is clear to see

Social media users said they had seen the cabanas in Perth, Adelaide, Sydney, Newcastle and Noosa as the tent’s popularity is clear to see

In Australia melanoma is the most common cancer for people aged 20 to 39, with one Australian dying from it every six hours

In Australia melanoma is the most common cancer for people aged 20 to 39, with one Australian dying from it every six hours

The move to discourage tanning and encourage skin safety is aligned with a recent move by TikTok.

When a user searches for anything related to tanning a banner that says, ‘Tanning. That’s Cooked’ appears.

It is also accompanied by information about the risks of tanning and useful links to the Melanoma Institute of Australia (MIA).

In Australia melanoma is the most common cancer for people aged 20 to 39, with one Australian dying from it every six hours.

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