Peaky Blinders reached its conclusion last night, with two of the central characters in series six, Diana Mitford and Oswald Mosley, announcing they were set to be married in Berlin in front of Adolf Hitler.

Offering lead character Tommy Shelby an invitation to their upcoming nuptials, the pair are seen gleefully boasting about their wedding plans in some of their final moments in the series.

However, did their life work out as blissfully as they hoped? The couple did in fact tie the knot in a civil ceremony in Joseph Goebbels’ drawing room in Berlin in 1936, with Hitler being the only other guest.

But as a result of her political leanings, during World War Two Diana was locked up as an enemy to the Allies in Holloway Prison.

Following her and her husband’s release from jail, they cruised the Mediterranean, before settling together in the Paris suburbs, with the Duke and Duchess of Windsor for neighbours. 

Here, FEMAIL reveals how the head of the British Union of Fascists and his wife, Diana, who ‘became arguably the most hated woman in England for a while’, lived out the rest of their lives…  

Peaky Blinders reached its conclusion last night, with two of the central characters in series six, Diana Mitford (played by Amber Anderson, above) and Oswald Mosley (played by Sam Claflin, above), announcing they were set to be married in Berlin in front of Adolf Hitler

Here, FEMAIL reveals how the head of the British Union of Fascists and his wife, Diana (pictured together in later life), who 'became arguably the most hated woman in England for a while', lived out the rest of their lives...

Here, FEMAIL reveals how the head of the British Union of Fascists and his wife, Diana (pictured together in later life), who ‘became arguably the most hated woman in England for a while’, lived out the rest of their lives…

MARRIED IN JOSEPH GOEBBELS BERLIN DRAWING ROOM, WITH HITLER AS THE ONLY GUEST 

After meeting at a garden party in 1932, Diana, who was born 17 June 1910 and died 11 August 2003, and Mosley (pictured together during the early 1940s), who was born 16 November 1896 and died 3 December 1980, embarked on an affair

After meeting at a garden party in 1932, Diana, who was born 17 June 1910 and died 11 August 2003, and Mosley (pictured together during the early 1940s), who was born 16 November 1896 and died 3 December 1980, embarked on an affair

After meeting at a garden party in 1932, Diana, who was born 17 June 1910 and died 11 August 2003, and Mosley, who was born 16 November 1896 and died 3 December 1980, embarked on an affair.

The former was married to her first husband Bryan Guinness, heir to the brewing fortune, and the latter was wed to Lady Cynthia Curzon, a daughter of Lord Curzon.

Mosley, founder and leader of the British Union of Fascists from 1932, wouldn’t divorce his wife for Diana, but in 1933, Cynthia died of peritonitis. 

Diana gave up all of society — she had been one of its darlings as a beautiful, newly married, rich young woman — when she left her first husband for Mosley.

Diana’s behaviour scandalised her family and they refused to support her choice to leave Bryan for Mosley, with the sister becoming briefly estranged. 

They tied the knot in a civil ceremony in a drawing room belonging to Joseph Goebbels, whose wife Magda was a friend of Diana’s, in Berlin in 1936. 

Hitler was the only other guest and he reportedly gifted them a photograph of himself in an eagle-topped silver frame.

Recalling her second husband, Diana said she ‘never regretted’ the steps she took to be married to him.

‘He had every gift, being handsome, generous, intelligent, and full of wonderful gaiety and joie de vivre. 

‘Of course I fell in love with him… and I have never regretted the step I took then,’ reported The Telegraph.

IMPRISONED DURING WWII AS AN ENEMY TO THE ALLIES 

The couple returning to the Shaven Crown Hotel in Shipton-under-Wychwood, Oxfordshire, where they are living under house arrest on 13 December 1943

The couple returning to the Shaven Crown Hotel in Shipton-under-Wychwood, Oxfordshire, where they are living under house arrest on 13 December 1943

In May 1940, as Hitler swept through France, Mosley (pictured in 1936) was imprisoned in Brixton under Defence Regulation 18b, which meant the Home Secretary could jail ‘any particular person if satisfied that it is necessary to do so’

In May 1940, as Hitler swept through France, Mosley (pictured in 1936) was imprisoned in Brixton under Defence Regulation 18b, which meant the Home Secretary could jail ‘any particular person if satisfied that it is necessary to do so’

In May 1940, as Hitler swept through France, Mosley was imprisoned in Brixton under Defence Regulation 18b, which meant the Home Secretary could jail ‘any particular person if satisfied that it is necessary to do so’.

And even though the Mitfords were cousins of Clementine Churchill, the wife of Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Diana could not escape also being arrested.

MI5 documents released in 2002 described Lady Mosley as ‘wildly ambitious’, stating: ‘Diana Mosley, wife of Sir Oswald Mosley, is reported on the “best authority”, that of her family and intimate circle, to be a public danger at the present time.

‘Is said to be far cleverer and more dangerous than her husband and will stick at nothing to achieve her ambitions.’

As a result, during World War Two she was locked up as an enemy to the Allies in Holloway Prison at the end of June 1940.

When asked by her lawyer if she was aware of anyone in the government who could help her, she replied: ‘Know anyone in the government? I know all the Tories beginning with Churchill. The whole lot deserve to be shot.’

Eventually Diana’s brother Tom intervened, using his connection with the Prime Minister, and Mosley was permitted to join his wife in married quarters at Holloway in December 1941.

In November 1943, the couple were released due to Mosley’s health and placed under house arrest until the end of the war.

Mary S. Lovell, who has written a biography on the Mitford sisters, said Diana ‘became arguably the most hated woman in England for a while.’ 

However, although many despised the sister for her political alliances, others admired her for her wit and beauty – believing she had eventually achieved a glamorous life once again. 

In the Peaky Blinders series, Diana’s character has been equally hated by viewers for her Nazi leanings, and last week, after she had steamy sex with Tommy Shelby, fans were calling for her to meet her end.

Diana, who at the time the show is set is the mistress of fascist politician Sir Oswald Mosley, has been making eyes at Tommy all series and last week made her intentions plain, telling him: ‘Oswald has f****d your wife so my suggestion is about balance and proportion. It would be only fair.’

The pair had sex in a hotel bed then Diana rubbed the encounter in the face of Tommy’s long-suffering wife Lizzie (Natasha O’Keefe), telling her over dinner that she had ‘sampled’ her husband.

CRUISED THE MEDITERRANEAN BEFORE SETTLING IN PARIS, WITH THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF WINDSOR FOR NEIGHBOURS 

Diana and Mosley

The Duke and Duchess of Windsor

Following the end of WWII, Diana and Mosley (pictured left) eventually moved to Paris, and the couple found they had much in common with their neighbours the Duke and Duchess of Windsor (pictured right)

The couple at Max Mosley's wedding to his bride Jean Taylor at Chelsea Register Office in 1960

The couple at Max Mosley’s wedding to his bride Jean Taylor at Chelsea Register Office in 1960

Following the end of WWII, Diana and Mosley lived on a farm in Wiltshire, where they were reportedly largely ignored by local residents. They also cruised the Mediterranean.

But in 1951, the couple left for France, with Mosley apparently then consumed with the notion of creating a united Europe.

Diana edited the magazine The European while in Paris, and the couple found they had much in common with their neighbours the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.  

The former king, who abdicated in 1936 to marry the divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson, told Nazis to keep bombing England during WWII and also passed information to Germany that aided the fall of France in 1940, according to a recent Channel 4 documentary.

Edward VIII: Britain’s Traitor King used evidence such as captured German documents that are held in the Royal Archives to support the claims.

The damning allegations come after years of academic research into how close to the Nazis the Duke of Windsor was and the effect of his friendships on the war.

Meanwhile, the Mitford sister even wrote a biography of Wallis, titled The Duchess of Windsor, in 1980.

Diana and Mosley also kept homes in Ireland and London following the war, but mainly settled in Temple de la Gloire in Paris.

Yet in 1998, due to her advancing age, Diana moved out of the home and instead lived in an apartment in Paris. Temple de la Gloire was sold in 2000 for £1million.   

DIANA REMAINED VAGUE ABOUT HER FASCIST BELIEFS IN LATER LIFE 

Throughout her later life, Diana (pictured left) remained vague when discussing her loyalties to Britain and her strong belief in fascism as well as her relationship with Hitler

Throughout her later life, Diana (pictured left) remained vague when discussing her loyalties to Britain and her strong belief in fascism as well as her relationship with Hitler

When she appeared on Desert Island Discs in 1989, she caused controversy by saying she hadn't believed Hitler had been exterminating Jews until 'years' after the war and refuted six million, the number of people who died, as 'not conceivable'. Pictured, Diana speaking at a meeting on behalf of her husband Mosley

When she appeared on Desert Island Discs in 1989, she caused controversy by saying she hadn’t believed Hitler had been exterminating Jews until ‘years’ after the war and refuted six million, the number of people who died, as ‘not conceivable’. Pictured, Diana speaking at a meeting on behalf of her husband Mosley

Throughout her later life, Diana remained vague when discussing her loyalties to Britain and her strong belief in fascism as well as her relationship with Hitler. 

When she appeared on Desert Island Discs in 1989, she caused controversy by saying she hadn’t believed Hitler had been exterminating Jews until ‘years’ after the war and refuted six million, the number of people who died, as ‘not conceivable’.

According to her obituary in The Telegraph, she was an ‘unrepentant Nazi’ and a diamond swastika was found among her jewels.  

Meanwhile she also said she ‘approved’ of Hitler, saying: ‘Hitler was attractive, though not handsome, with great inner dynamism and charm. 

‘Charm can mean so many things; I don’t suppose I’ve met anyone quite so charming. It might be just that he was powerful, I suppose, but it seemed more than that.’

In her 1977 autobiography A Life of Contrasts, she wrote: ‘I didn’t love Hitler any more than I did Winston [Churchill]. I can’t regret it, it was so interesting.’

Diana’s favour for Hitler even outran that of Mosley, who later in life would brand him ‘a terrible little man’.



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