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Chilling video shows the churchgoer who beheaded her vulnerable Malaysian pensioner friend dragging the suitcase containing her corpse in public, lifting it into her car boot and then driving more than 200 miles to woodland in Devon to dump the body – before bizarrely asking police if she could get her shoes as she was arrested for murder.

Former osteopath Jemma Mitchell beat 67-year-old Mee Kuen Chong over the head with a weapon at her London home, then cut off her head and used her skills as a body dissection expert to remove evidence of the brutal killing by disposing of the body in woods in Salcombe, Devon two weeks later.

The prosecution claimed that she had planned to murder Ms Chong, a devout Church and vulnerable divorcee known as Deborah who she met at church, and fake her will to inherit the bulk of her estate worth more than £700,000, after the pensioner backed out of giving her £200,000 to pay for repairs to Mitchell’s £4million dilapidated family home.

A jury at the Old Bailey deliberated for seven hours to find Mitchell guilty of murder.  Wearing a loose white shirt under an off-white cardigan, Mitchell had smiled when her barrister Richard Jory KC told her the jury had reached a decision. But upon hearing the jury’s unanimous guilty verdict, she looked stunned. The Common Serjeant of London, Judge Richard Marks said he will pass sentence tomorrow.

CCTV shows Mitchell arriving at Ms Chong’s home carrying a large blue suitcase, allegedly containing her murder kit, on the morning of June 11 last year. More than four hours later, she emerged from the property in Wembley with the suitcase appearing bulkier and heavier.

The prosecution said CCTV appeared to show Mitchell struggling to carry the unwieldy suitcase because it contained a body. She also had with her a smaller bag full of Ms Chong’s financial documents, which were later recovered from Mitchell’s home.

After the victim’s lodger reported her missing, Mitchell claimed she had gone to visit family friends ‘somewhere close to the ocean’ as she was feeling ‘depressed’. In reality, Mitchell had decapitated Ms Chong and stored her remains in the garden of the house she shared with her retired mother in Willesden, north-west London, the prosecution suggested.

The jury were also shown video of Mitchell’s arrest by police on suspicion of murder on July 6 – and the moment she asks: ‘Can I put my shoes on?’.  After she was cautioned Mitchell said: ‘I know that she has gone away.’ She then turned to her mother and said: ‘It’s not true. There’s no one mummy.’

Jemma Mitchell

Mee Kuen Chong

Former osteopath Jemma Mitchell (left) hit Mee Kuen Chong (right) over the head with a weapon at her London home and left her decapitated and badly decomposed body in woods in Salcombe, Devon two weeks later 

Screen grab taken from CCTV issued by Metropolitan Police of Jemma Mitchell

Screen grab taken from CCTV issued by Metropolitan Police of Jemma Mitchell

Metropolitan Police handout of the suitcase used to carry Ms Chong's headless body to Devon

Metropolitan Police handout of the suitcase used to carry Ms Chong’s headless body to Devon

Undated Metropolitan Police handout photo of the site where the body was dumped in Salcombe, Devon

Undated Metropolitan Police handout photo of the site where the body was dumped in Salcombe, Devon 

CCTV handout from the Metropolitan Police of Mitchell being arrested by police

CCTV handout from the Metropolitan Police of Mitchell being arrested by police

Court illustration of Mitchell appearing at the Old Bailey. She has been found guilty of murder

Court illustration of Mitchell appearing at the Old Bailey. She has been found guilty of murder

Ms Chong went missing on June 11 last year and her body was found hundreds of miles away 16 days later

Ms Chong went missing on June 11 last year and her body was found hundreds of miles away 16 days later 

Revealed: Mitchell has conviction for a breach of a non-molestation order relating to her sister and brother-in-law

It can now be reported that Mitchell has a conviction for a breach of a non-molestation order relating to family members.

In 2016, she received a conditional discharge at North West London Magistrates’ Court for breaching the order in respect of her sister and brother-in-law.

Since moving back to the UK, Mitchell was unemployed as she focused on her ill-fated home renovation project which had been beset with problems.

She was never registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC), so could not legally practise as an osteopath in Britain.

Detective Chief Inspector Jim Eastwood, who led the investigation, described it as a ‘truly despicable crime’.

He said: ‘The motivation for Jemma Mitchell’s actions was money and she showed a significant degree of planning and calculation as she attempted to cover up her horrific actions. The cold facts of this case are shocking.

‘Deborah Chong was a vulnerable lady – in the weeks before her murder, she was seeking help for her declining mental health.

‘However, Mitchell – so desperate to obtain the money she needed to complete the renovations on her house – sought to take advantage of Deborah’s good will, but when Deborah changed her mind, she callously murdered her and embarked upon an attempt to fraudulently obtain her estate.

‘Over the course of two weeks following Deborah’s murder we can only speculate as to what Mitchell did with the body and what her wider plan was.

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‘The decomposition when the body was found was at such an advanced state that Mitchell may have begun to fear Deborah’s body would be discovered – whether this forced her into moving the body and why she chose Salcombe in Devon, we may never know.

‘However, what is clear is that Mitchell – seeing her chance to obtain the funds she so desperately desired disappear – decided to attack and murder a vulnerable lady for her own gain in a truly despicable crime.’

During the trial, jurors viewed CCTV footage of Mitchell arriving at Ms Chong’s home carrying a large blue suitcase, allegedly containing her murder kit, on the morning of June 11 last year.

More than four hours later, she emerged from the property in Wembley, north-west London, with the suitcase appearing bulkier and heavier.

The prosecution said CCTV appeared to show Mitchell struggling to carry the unwieldy suitcase because it contained a body. She also had with her a smaller bag full of Ms Chong’s financial documents, which were later recovered from Mitchell’s home.

After the victim’s lodger reported her missing, Mitchell claimed she had gone to visit family friends ‘somewhere close to the ocean’ as she was feeling ‘depressed’.

In reality, Mitchell had decapitated Ms Chong and stored her remains in the garden of the house she shared with her retired mother in Willesden, north-west London, the prosecution suggested.

On June 26 last year, she stowed the body inside the suitcase in the boot of a hire car and drove to Devon. En route to Salcombe, the Volvo blew a tyre and Mitchell was forced to drive into a service station and call for assistance. The repairman called to change the wheel described Mitchell’s ‘confused’ demeanour and an ‘odd musty smell’ inside the vehicle.

Jurors heard that none of the people who came to her aid saw the large blue suitcase in the boot, suggesting she had stashed it somewhere nearby, according to the prosecution.

Ms Chong was said to be a vulnerable person and prone to erratic behaviour

Ms Chong was said to be a vulnerable person and prone to erratic behaviour

Metropolitan Police handout of the suitcase used to carry Ms Chong's headless body to Devon

Metropolitan Police handout of the suitcase used to carry Ms Chong’s headless body to Devon

Jurors heard that Mitchell was in Salcombe on June 26 last year, having travelled there in a rented grey Volvo

Jurors heard that Mitchell was in Salcombe on June 26 last year, having travelled there in a rented grey Volvo

Undated Metropolitan Police handout photo of the site in Salcombe, Devon

Undated Metropolitan Police handout photo of the site in Salcombe, Devon 

Profile of a killer: How Australia-born former osteopath murdered her Christian friend in ‘truly despicable’ killing 

Mitchell was born in Australia where her mother, Hillary Collard, had worked for the Foreign Office. When her mother and father divorced, she moved back to the UK with her mother and her sister, who later accused her of harassment and won a non-molestation court order.

Mitchell had been a brilliant medical student and studied Human Sciences at Kings College London and won a first-class degree in 2004. Part of the course was module called the ‘Structural Basis of Human Function’ where she learned how to dissect bodies. 

Mitchell also completed a special study course in ‘Experimental Anatomy’ and was so adept she won the Hamilton Prize for anatomical excellence.

She worked as an osteopath in Australia for seven years but her medical career did not work out and she returned to live with her mother at their £2million home in Brondesbury Park, which had been in the family for generations.

Mitchell lived on the first floor and her mother lived on the ground floor. She began to become more religious and started hoarding items. Some of the rooms at the house were so full of junk, she struggled to get through the doors and the kitchen was filthy with rotting food on the cooker and freezers packed full of food which had passed their sell-by date years ago.

Mitchell dreamed of making a fortune through property development, particularly extending her own home.

After the first builder went bust, Mitchell was quoted £500,000 to complete the house. She hired a second contractor and paid him £100,000, but then ran out of money and the work was terminated.

Mitchell met Malaysian Ms Chong in August 2020 and within a few weeks she was talking to her about her disastrous finances.

Ms Chong was mentally unstable and wrote bizarre letters to King Charles and Boris Johnson, thinking they were her boyfriends. She was also very generous with her money and had given one friend £50,000 to buy a home.

At first Mitchell suggested she could sign her Wembley property over her to her to avoid inheritance tax. Ms Chong declined but Mitchell continued to pressure her for almost a year.

Six months before she died, the victim agreed to give her £200,000 for repairs, providing the house was used for Christian worship.

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But by June 7 last year, she had decided against it and told Mitchell when she when came to her home that day. The next day the victim she sent her a message saying ‘Until you sold house, I won’t want you to come to me or my house I am stress to the core.’

When Mitchell suggested visiting Ms Chong on the day she vanished, June 11, the victim told her in a text ‘not talk about house or money, stresses them both out.’

Mitchell was captured on CCTV going to Chaplin Road at 8am with the empty blue suitcase. She was filmed again struggling with the now full suitcase five hours later at 1.13pm as she left the house to take a cab home. Mitchell also had a smaller red and blue case belonging to the victim, full of her personal documents.

Ms Chong’s headless body was found by holidaymakers beside a woodland footpath near Salcombe the next day. The victim, who was 5ft 2in and slim, appeared to have been redressed in clothes meant for a larger woman, jurors heard.

Following a police search of the area, Ms Chong’s skull was recovered a few metres away from the body. A search of Mitchell’s home uncovered Ms Chong’s fake will and personal papers. The blue suitcase had been stored on the roof of a neighbour’s shed.

Although no forensic evidence was recovered from the suitcase, Ms Chong’s DNA was identified on a bloodstained tea towel in a pocket.

Mitchell’s defence asserted that there was no evidence to confirm Ms Chong’s body was in the suitcase and pointed to the lack of evidence indicating a violent assault at her home.

But Deanna Heer KC, prosecuting, suggested Mitchell breaking a finger while at Ms Chong’s house was evidence of a struggle, as well as the fact she lied about it afterwards.

Jurors heard that Ms Chong had suffered from schizophrenia and was referred for help after writing letters to the then-Prince of Wales and prime minister Boris Johnson.

In the months leading up to her murder, she had berated Mitchell for being a messy ‘hoarder’.

She appeared to change her mind about bankrolling Mitchell’s building work, telling her she should sell her house and enjoy the money instead.

Mitchell’s legal team suggested that the Willesden property, which had been in the family for generations, was worth £4million and she had £93,000 in the bank so did not need the money.

Mitchell was born in Australia where her mother, Hillary Collard, had worked for the Foreign Office. When her mother and father divorced, she moved back to the UK with her mother and her sister, who later accused her of harassment and won a non-molestation court order.

Mitchell had been a brilliant medical student and studied Human Sciences at Kings College London and won a first-class degree in 2004. Part of the course was module called the ‘Structural Basis of Human Function’ where she learned how to dissect bodies. 

Mitchell also completed a special study course in ‘Experimental Anatomy’ and was so adept she won the Hamilton Prize for anatomical excellence.

She worked as an osteopath in Australia for seven years but her medical career did not work out and she returned to live with her mother at their £2million home in Brondesbury Park, which had been in the family for generations.

Mitchell lived on the first floor and her mother lived on the ground floor. She began to become more religious and started hoarding items. Some of the rooms at the house were so full of junk, she struggled to get through the doors and the kitchen was filthy with rotting food on the cooker and freezers packed full of food which had passed their sell-by date years ago.

Mitchell dreamed of making a fortune through property development, particularly extending her own home.

After the first builder went bust, Mitchell was quoted £500,000 to complete the house. She hired a second contractor and paid him £100,000, but then ran out of money and the work was terminated.

Mitchell met Malaysian Ms Chong in August 2020 and within a few weeks she was talking to her about her disastrous finances.

Ms Chong was mentally unstable and wrote bizarre letters to King Charles and Boris Johnson, thinking they were her boyfriends. She was also very generous with her money and had given one friend £50,000 to buy a home.

At first Mitchell suggested she could sign her Wembley property over her to her to avoid inheritance tax. Ms Chong declined but Mitchell continued to pressure her for almost a year.

Six months before she died, the victim agreed to give her £200,000 for repairs, providing the house was used for Christian worship.

But by June 7 last year, she had decided against it and told Mitchell when she when came to her home that day. The next day the victim she sent her a message saying ‘Until you sold house, I won’t want you to come to me or my house I am stress to the core.’

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When Mitchell suggested visiting Ms Chong on the day she vanished, June 11, the victim told her in a text ‘not talk about house or money, stresses them both out.’

Mitchell was captured on CCTV going to Chaplin Road at 8am with the empty blue suitcase. She was filmed again struggling with the now full suitcase five hours later at 1.13pm as she left the house to take a cab home. Mitchell also had a smaller red and blue case belonging to the victim, full of her personal documents.

Later that day, Mitchell was treated in hospital for a broken finger, which she explained she had injured in a car door. However, the cab driver told police she had the injury when he picked her up.

On June 26 she hired a Volvo from Hertz and lay a white sheet in the boot before struggling to load the blue suitcase into the back of the car.

She now was using a phone belonging to a neighbour which she had stolen from his flat after he died and reactivated under his name.

Stored in its memory were Google Maps searches for locations on the Devon and the Cornwall coast, including ‘Salcombe, North Sands, Cliff Road’ where the body was found.

When she was in Devon, the Volvo got a puncture but Mitchell drove on damaging the wheel. She eventually stopped at a Co-op garage in Salcombe Road, Marlborough, close to the south Devon coast and was ‘shaky and distressed.’

Mitchell told customers who tried to help her that she was ‘visiting family in Paignton and had come to Salcombe for a scenic drive.’

Ms Chong's fractured skull was found in undergrowth a few metres away from the body days later

Ms Chong’s fractured skull was found in undergrowth a few metres away from the body days later 

An AA man who changed the wheel noticed the car had ‘a strange smell – sort of musty and damp.’ .

Mitchell insisted that the damaged wheel should be placed on the back seat of the car and not the boot before she continued on her journey. She drove out of the garage and turned towards Salcombe at 8.49pm.

Later that evening the car was captured on a CCTV camera overlooking Bennett Road, close to the location where the body was to be found the following day by a family on holiday.

By 6.30am the following morning Mitchell was back in London and dropped the car off at the hire company telling staff the tyre had ‘just blown.’

When police contacted Mitchell as they searched for the victim, she left a voice mail saying: ‘I tried to return your call yesterday… I was getting in touch to let you know that Mee said she was planning to stay with friends near her sister’s family on the coast. She said she felt neglected on 7 June 2021 and wanted to leave.’

On July 6 police arrived at Brondesbury Park to arrest Mitchell. After she was cautioned Mitchell said: ‘I know that she has gone away.’ She then turned to her mother and said: ‘It’s not true.’

But police had found a handbag next to the victim’s body containing a length of orange rope of which an Identical type was found among the rubbish at Mitchell’s home. Police also found a 2021 wall calendar with an entry written by Mitchell for June 26, the day she drove to Salcombe, in two different inks. It read: ‘8am collect body back C letter will copy 2 hr walk.’

In a box in the bedroom was a copy of Mitchell’s will, written in 2017 and a will in the name of the victim, dated October 27, 2020, which made Mitchell the main beneficiary.

It left 95 per cent of the deceased’s estate to the defendant ‘to be applied for the benefit of ‘Brondesbury Park’s projects’ and five per cent to the defendant’s mother, Hillary Collard.

The will had been faked by Mitchell who had forged the signatures including that of a witness who had not seen Mitchell since 2013.

Detectives searched her computer and found the Word document of the will which she had created on 1st July 2021, three weeks after she murdered Ms Chong.

Officers also found a torn-out newspaper article in Mitchell’s bedroom entitled ‘The Do’s and Don’ts of Claiming an Estate’ dated June 28, 2021.

Prosecutor Deanna Heer told the court: ‘A large sum was needed to complete the repairs on the defendant’s house.

‘In Mee Kuen Chong, the prosecution say the defendant found someone from whom she thought she could get that money – by persuading Mee Kuen Chong to give it to her, or if not when she was alive, then by forging her will after she had killed her.’

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