Daniel Andrews has labelled Victoria the best state in the country by making a bizarre comparison to the US in his first press conference as re-elected premier.

Mr Andrews labelled his home-state as the centre of critical thinking and progress just as Massachusetts is in America. 

‘When you become premier of this great state, and this is the greatest state in our nation, there is no question about that, how it had a view that we were the Massachusetts of our country,’ he said on Sunday.

Massachusetts is considered to be one of the more forward-thinking states in the US with its legislation on public education and healthcare the envy of the country.

Mr Andrews claimed Massachusetts was more like Victoria explaining his state and its progressive policies were an inspiration to the world. 

The re-elected premier vowed to stay true to its image and begin delivering straight away on his election promises such as free kindergarten and TAFE courses. 

Daniel Andrews has revealed how he spent his first night celebrating as the re-elected premier of Victoria while praising the state as the best in the country

‘I want to thank all those Victorians who supported us,’ he said.

‘We will deliver more nurses, more ambulances, more schools, also make sure that we bring back the State Electricity Commission, renewable energy for all Victorians.

‘We are a progressive state, we are a full state, we are the centre of critical thinking, the centre of all the big ideas in our nation and we are best when we’re out in front,’ he said.

Poll

Do you agree with Dan Andrews that Victoria ‘is the best state in Australia’

  • Yes 47 votes
  • No 182 votes

‘Leading our nation and in so many different agendas, mental health, family violence, early childhood occasion, renewable energy, climate change action, not climate change talk, many other areas.’ 

Mr Andrews admitted he had very little sleep after the election was called in his favour on Saturday night.

‘I did not get on the beers but many others did, which I thoroughly endorse because we’re back,’ he said.

Mr Andrews promised to keep the press conference short as he insisted he would waste no time in fulfilling his role as premier for a third term. 

‘Victoria is open. Not just open for business, Victoria is open for big ideas and reform,’ he said.

‘We are always at our best when we lead our nation and be in to doubt, we are leading our nation in so many areas.’ 

Mr Andrews vowed he would not back down from bringing back the State Electricity Scheme, a policy that would bring back state-controlled electricity.

The premier explained it would help to drive down power bills and slammed ‘greedy prophets’ and energy companies that opposed the move.

‘We had a gut full of these big greedy companies that said they are leaving,’ he said.

‘Well, good luck to you, off you go, we will replace you with something better.’ 

Mr Andrews denied claims that the only reason he led Labor to a third straight election was so he could have a statue of him erected early next year. 

Any Victorian premier who serves 3,000 days in office gets immortalised with a statue outside the State Government Office at No 1 Treasury Place in Melbourne.

‘I’m not about legacies. (I’m) about working hard and getting things done,’ he said.

The statue honour was created by former Liberal premier Jeff Kennett, who expected he would be a beneficiary by winning the 1999 state election. 

As of Sunday, Mr Andrews has been Premier for 2,915 days and will reach the 3,000 days milestone in February. 

Doing so would make him just the fifth premier to get a statue and the first to get it while still in power. 

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews celebrates during his victory speech at the Labor election party surrounded by his wife and children

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews celebrates during his victory speech at the Labor election party surrounded by his wife and children

Liberal senator Jane Hume has slammed Dan Andrews, describing his election victory speech as 'not gracious' and 'really rude and disrespectful'

Liberal senator Jane Hume has slammed Dan Andrews, describing his election victory speech as ‘not gracious’ and ‘really rude and disrespectful’

His press conference came as a high-profile Liberal senator slammed Mr Andrews’ victory speech on Saturday night as ‘really rude’ and accused him of making his critics out to be anti-vaxxers.

Mr Andrews kissed his wife, pumped his fists and trumpeted his controversial Covid policies – which included a 263-day lockdown of Melbourne, the world’s longest – as a tough decision that ultimately succeeded and united Victoria. 

However, his comments were criticised by a furious Jane Hume, with the Liberal senator describing his victory speech as ‘not gracious’.   

VICTORIA RESULTS AS OF 3AM SUNDAY 

Labor: 54 seats 

LNP: 20

Green: 4 

‘I always believe that the electorate gets it right and they made their voice very clear tonight,’ she said on Sky News. ‘However, that was not a gracious speech.

‘He didn’t mention Matthew Guy and it essentially said that the only reason that people disliked him was if they were anti-vaxxers. I thought that was really rude and totally disrespectful to his opponents.’

An ecstatic Mr Andrews, whose party had an easy majority of 54 seats as of 3am Sunday morning, admitted he had slept ‘not very much’ since the election was called in his favour last night.

‘My politics has never been about the win, it is always about the work,’ he told ABC Insiders on Sunday.

‘You’ve got to win to do that, but I grew up being taught every day that with opportunity comes a profound obligation to do your best, to work hard, to do what matters, and that’s exactly what I’ve delivered over these last eight years and I’m humbled and so grateful, so, so grateful that Victorians have re-elected a majority Labor government.’

Mr Andrews dodged questions about Labor’s favourability taking a hit in some electorates because of his hard lockdown policies and stay-at-home orders with his party suffering a 9 per cent swing in Melbourne’s north-west suburbs.  

‘They couldn’t work from home, many of them. What do you put those swings down to?’ host David Speers asked.

‘Well, the point you make, not being able to work from home and things of that nature,’ Mr Andrews responded.

‘That’s why being in work is so important. Our political opponents were going to cancel projects and what happens when you cancel projects, you cancel jobs. 

‘We will work hard for the community and not just those communities. I’m fully aware that while being resoundingly elected, there were Victorians that didn’t vote for us and I will work for them, to. That’s part of my job.’ 

Mr Andrews insisted he would serve the full four year term and that one of his biggest priorities will be pushing for a gas reserve.

A jubilant Mr Andrews with his wife and children ahead of his victory speech after he won a third term as Victoria's Premier

A jubilant Mr Andrews with his wife and children ahead of his victory speech after he won a third term as Victoria’s Premier

‘When it comes to energy, the cheapest form of energy is renewable energy. That is a fact. On gas, I’m very encouraged,’ he said.

‘My discussions with Prime Minister Anthony Albanese have been very positive. We need a gas reserve. Our gas for our businesses and our households. That’s what’s really, really important.’

His comments came after the premier took to the stage with his wife Cath and children Grace, Noah and Joseph at a victory party in his seat of Mulgrave, in Melbourne’s south-east, on Saturday.

He told his jubilant supporters: ‘Friends, these last few years have been incredibly challenging. We have had to make some very difficult decisions, some very tough decisions, and Victorian families and businesses right across our state have had a very difficult time.

‘This was a one-in-100 year event. And because of the tough decisions that we made, and… the fact that Victorians stuck together… we went out and got vaccinated. Because vaccines work.

Daniel Andrews hugs his mother Jan as he arrives to make his victory speech after his win on Saturday night - with Labor keeping a majority government

Daniel Andrews hugs his mother Jan as he arrives to make his victory speech after his win on Saturday night – with Labor keeping a majority government

‘As a community we were not, as some would say, divided. We were instead united in our faith in science. That sense of kindness, that sense of connection… has been confirmed today. Friends, hope always defeats hate.’ 

The Labor leader was greeted with hugs from his mother and sister – as well as chants of ‘four more years’ from the adoring party faithful.

He also shared leadership advice given to him by former prime minister Paul Keating to back up his argument.

‘Reforming giant and Labor icon Paul Keating once said to me, “son, leadership is not about doing what is popular, leadership is about doing what is right”,’ he said.

‘Essentially, he was telling me that leadership is about doing what matters and that’s exactly what the people of this great state have endorsed today.’

Daniel Andrews kisses his wife Catherine during his victory speech at the Labor election party - where he called her his 'best friend'

Daniel Andrews kisses his wife Catherine during his victory speech at the Labor election party – where he called her his ‘best friend’

About 10.50pm on Saturday, Opposition Leader Matthew Guy conceded in a call to Mr Andrews – the second one that he has made, and almost certainly the last.

Mr Guy, flanked by his wife Renae, told supporters in Doncaster: ‘Post this election that we come together as Victorians know that the best of our state should be ahead of us, not behind us.

‘There have been some truly tremendous swings to our side of politics in Melbourne’s north and west, swings above 15 per cent approaching 20 per cent in Melbourne’s northern and western suburbs.

‘We’ve got a lot of work to do, we know that. But we also know that our time in the sun will come again.’

Major networks – the ABC, Sky, Seven and Nine – all called the race in favour of Mr Andrews shortly after 8pm. 

Early in the night, ABC election analyst Antony Green projected the ALP will win at least 50 seats in the lower house, a simple majority. But the results have already gone beyond that number.

Labor supporters react at the Labor Party reception in Melbourne as Dan Andrews wins a third term

Labor supporters react at the Labor Party reception in Melbourne as Dan Andrews wins a third term

Mr Andrews’ party campaigned on a platform of free kindergarten, mega infrastructure projects and a state-run renewable energy company.

The Greens also look set to make significant gains at Saturday’s poll. They retained the seats of Brunswick, Melbourne, Prahran and were projected to pick up Northcote and Richmond.

Despite losing skin in the inner city to the Greens, Labor campaign chair and former deputy premier James Merlino said it was a magnificent victory.

‘There’s tight contests in those seats in Footscray and Albert Park and Pascoe Vale. I’m hopeful we’ll get over the line in those contests,’ he told reporters.

‘Overall this is quite an extraordinary victory for the Labor Party, for Dan as the premier of our state.

Jubilant Labor supporters react at the party's reception in Melbourne on Saturday after Mr Andrews' win

Jubilant Labor supporters react at the party’s reception in Melbourne on Saturday after Mr Andrews’ win

‘(It’s) only the third time in the history of the Victorian parliamentary Labor party that we’ve secured three (straight) terms.’

The ALP victory was celebrated by Prime Minister Anthony Albanese. ‘Congratulations @DanielAndrewsMP, what a great win,’ he tweeted soon after the result became clear.

The divisive Premier’s victory comes despite his hardline Covid policies that saw Melbourne forced into a 263-day lockdown, the longest in the world.   

The response to Covid was draconian with rubber bullets last year fired at anti-lockdown protesters in Melbourne while a pregnant woman was arrested in her Ballarat home in 2020 for posting a protest message on social media. 

Major networks - the ABC, Sky, Seven and Nine - all called the race in favour of Mr Andrews shortly after 8pm

Major networks – the ABC, Sky, Seven and Nine – all called the race in favour of Mr Andrews shortly after 8pm

The divisive Premier's victory comes despite his hardline Covid policies that saw Melbourne forced into a 263-day lockdown, the longest in the world

The divisive Premier’s victory comes despite his hardline Covid policies that saw Melbourne forced into a 263-day lockdown, the longest in the world

Mr Andrews’ political opponents claim the lockdowns are set to leave a costly legacy with the conservative Institute of Public Affairs think tank calculating they cost the state $218billion – or $33,000 for every Victorian. 

Daniel Wild, the IPA’s deputy executive director, said this week that the economic damage was set to linger for many years. 

‘Victoria’s botched Covid response, including the world’s longest lockdown, has left us all with a massive economic hangover,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘By implementing the world’s longest lockdown, Victoria’s most productive industries, tradies and small businesses were forced to sit on their hands and, not surprisingly, our economy suffered greatly.’ 

The lockdowns were costly on the state’s finances with affected businesses last year entitled to up to $8,400 each as compensation.

Anthony Albanese sent Daniel Andrews a congratulatory message on Instagram after his election win

Anthony Albanese sent Daniel Andrews a congratulatory message on Instagram after his election win

Labor party supporters cheer as they hear about the Labor party's win in Victoria on Saturday night

Labor party supporters cheer as they hear about the Labor party’s win in Victoria on Saturday night

Victoria’s gross government debt levels are also more than double revenue, with a 189.2 per cent debt-to-revenue ratio forecast for 2022-23.

Budget papers showed public service debt, which includes superannuation liabilities, climbing from $119.4billion in June 2022 to $196.8billion by June 2026.

Net debt – or what a government owes minus its assets – was expected to climb from $101.9billion in June 2022 to $167.5billion by June 2026.

Mr Andrews sent out a optimistic message as polls closed at 6pm on Saturday, telling voters ‘we’ll see you soon’ alongside a grinning photo. 

His confidence was called into question earlier in the night, with Peta Credlin, the former chief of staff to Liberal prime minister Tony Abbott, declaring early that there is ‘no doubt the swing is on’. 

However, that swing – of about three per cent – was nowhere near significant enough to sweep his government from office.

Major networks - the ABC, Sky, Seven and Nine - all called the race in favour of Mr Andrews shortly after 8pm

Major networks – the ABC, Sky, Seven and Nine – all called the race in favour of Mr Andrews shortly after 8pm

The divisive Premier's victory comes despite his hardline Covid policies that saw Melbourne forced into a 263-day lockdown, the longest in the world

The divisive Premier’s victory comes despite his hardline Covid policies that saw Melbourne forced into a 263-day lockdown, the longest in the world

Steve Bracks, former Victoria Premier for Labor, told Seven about 8pm: ‘I can call it, I think it’s impossible for the Liberals to win. I think it’s almost certainly a majority Labor government.’

And ex state Liberal president Michael Kroger told Sky News about the same time: ‘On balance they’re going to hold government by a majority. The early figures are uniform across the place, and that’s what’s disappointing.’

‘Now, we are yet to determine whether that’s the majority or minority government. But what we can’t see is a pathway for the Coalition to win enough seats to get into government and Labor will end up with more seats than the Coalition.’

Earlier in the evening, former Strictly Ballroom star Paul Mercurio clinched the seat of Hastings for Labor from the Liberals.

The mood was somber at the Liberal Party reception as the results came in just after 8pm

The mood was somber at the Liberal Party reception as the results came in just after 8pm

Ex state Liberal president Michael Kroger told Sky News: 'On balance they're going to hold government by a majority

Ex state Liberal president Michael Kroger told Sky News: ‘On balance they’re going to hold government by a majority

But it was not the only seat to change hands into a celebrity’s, as former professional tennis player Sam Groth declared victory in the seat of Nepean on the Mornington Peninsula, prying it from Labor early in the count.

‘I certainly wasn’t expecting them to call it this this early in the night, I’m very happy,’ Mr Groth said. ‘I haven’t had the chance to have a beer yet.’

Reacting to the result, a disappointed Georgie Crozier, shadow health minister for the Liberals, described the night as ‘incredibly disappointing’.

‘Judging from these early votes that are coming in, obviously it is not a good result for us. It is incredibly disappointing. That is evident from what we’re seeing. 

Labor party supporters watching the election count telecast in Daniel Andrews seat of Mulgrave

Labor party supporters watching the election count telecast in Daniel Andrews seat of Mulgrave

Mr Andrews' vaccine mandates infuriated some workers, but were accepted by most of the population

Mr Andrews’ vaccine mandates infuriated some workers, but were accepted by most of the population

Labor supporters react at the Labor Party reception in Melbourne on a successful night

Labor supporters react at the Labor Party reception in Melbourne on a successful night

‘As others have said, we have to take on board this and learn from it and, you know, get back on that horse and show we are a viable alternative. 

‘We’ve worked hard. We had what I felt was a very strong message but, clearly, the Victorian public haven’t taken that.’

And discussing the Greens surge, former Liberal premier Jeff Kennett said the higher Greens vote in non-Melbourne seats is ‘surprising’ and could cause ‘a very strong result for the government, sadly’.

‘What is surprising, even in these early numbers, is the high Greens vote,’ Kennett added.

‘For them to be getting 15 per cent in seats away from their own area if these figures hold up … those preferences will go to the Labor Party and you might find a very strong result for the government, sadly.’

Party faithful watch on a broadcast of election results at the Liberal Party reception in Melbourne

Party faithful watch on a broadcast of election results at the Liberal Party reception in Melbourne

Peta Credlin rips into the Liberal Party for ‘losing SO well’ as Daniel Andrews wins a third term 

BY BRETT LACKEY FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA

Conservative Sky News commentator Peta Credlin has unleashed a furious spray at the Victorian Liberal Party as they suffer a convincing loss to Daniel Andrews‘ Labor in the state election.

Credlin – who was once touted as a potential challenger to Andrews at the polls – fumed that the party was getting ‘very comfortable’ with the fact it was in Opposition and lost the election despite having ‘lots’ to work with against the Premier.

Credlin, the former chief of staff to Liberal PM Tony Abbott, said the party was being destroyed by ‘factional warlordism’ and slammed senior MPs for telling Federal Liberals to butt out, as they ‘don’t understand Victoria’.

‘Really?! Because you lose so well at a state level in areas where we don’t lose at a federal level.’ 

Ms Credlin said the Victorian Liberals need to be brave enough to clear out the ‘dead-wood’ that has been around for 20 years and ‘achieved sweet bugger all’.

‘You can see in seats like Hastings and Nepean if you put in fresh blood into the ballot people will support it’.

‘The Liberal Party isn’t sure in Victoria what it stands for and I have to say it’s become very, very comfortable in Opposition,’ Credlin said.

‘It’s lost the belief in itself that it can take on Labor and win.’

‘You’re up against Dan Andrews and you can see in the swings (against Labor) that there’s cranky people.’

‘There’s plenty to work with.’

Sky News host Peta Credlin (pictured left) blamed 'factional warlordism' and the Liberals 'being comfortable in Opposition' for their defeat in the Victorian election on Saturday

Sky News host Peta Credlin (pictured left) blamed ‘factional warlordism’ and the Liberals ‘being comfortable in Opposition’ for their defeat in the Victorian election on Saturday

 



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