‘Collaborators’ held as Russia leaves a city of booby traps: Angry locals in Kherson confront men as they are tied to lampposts after being accused of helping Vladimir Putin’s troops during Ukraine invasion

  • Two collaborators rounded up yesterday after Ukrainian troops entered Kherson
  • Many who collaborated with Russians have fled the city in the past few weeks
  • Fears there may still be some Russian forces present in city and surroundings
  • Ukrainians dealing with huge devastation and booby traps left by fleeing forces 

Tied to posts, two suspected collaborators are confronted by residents in Kherson.

They were rounded up after Ukrainian troops swept into the southern city following the Russian evacuation.

Many of those who collaborated with the Russians after they occupied Kherson at the start of the war in March have fled the city in the past few weeks.

But these two men were detained yesterday and were being guarded by a Ukrainian soldier as they awaited their fate. 

Although there was jubilation in Kherson yesterday over the liberation, there are fears some Russian forces may still be present in the city and the surrounding area. Intelligence officials said they could be dressed in civilian clothes to avoid capture.

The Ukrainians are dealing with huge devastation and booby traps left by fleeing Russians.

Tied to posts, two suspected collaborators are confronted by residents in the recently liberated city of Kherson

Ukrainian troops received a rapturous reception from residents as they entered Kherson, but the true toll of eight months of occupation has begun to emerge

Ukrainian troops received a rapturous reception from residents as they entered Kherson, but the true toll of eight months of occupation has begun to emerge

Nearly 2,000 explosives including mines, trip wires and unexploded ordnance have already been cleared by ten bomb disposal groups in the liberated city.

It came as Defence Secretary Ben Wallace warned: ‘Russia is a long way from giving up.’ He said Moscow will be ‘worried’ and ‘disappointed’ by the loss of Kherson, but added that it is important not to ‘underestimate’ the Russians.

‘History will remind you that Russia can be brutal to their own,’ Mr Wallace said. ‘If they need more cannon fodder, that is what they’ll be doing.’

Ukraine’s president Volodymyr Zelensky said last night that investigators had uncovered more than 400 Russian war crimes and found the bodies of both servicemen and civilians in the Kherson area.

Although there was jubilation in Kherson yesterday over the liberation, there are fears some Russian forces may still be present in the city and the surrounding area

Although there was jubilation in Kherson yesterday over the liberation, there are fears some Russian forces may still be present in the city and the surrounding area

Return of Soviet-style rifle lessons in schools 

Russia is bringing back Soviet-era military training in schools in the face of huge troop losses in Ukraine.

Children will be taught how to handle and fire Kalashnikovs – as well as learning first aid and how to respond to chemical and nuclear attacks.

It is believed officials are reviving a Communist programme in response to repeated defeats in Ukraine.

Vladimir Putin has been recruiting conscripts for his illegal invasion but the poorly trained troops have failed to turn the tide for Moscow.

Russia is planning to start the training programme in September next year, the Ministry of Defence revealed, adding that Moscow said no fewer than 140 hours per academic year should be devoted to it.

The MoD said the plan is probably designed to ‘prepare students with military skills as they approach conscription age and to increase the take-up for mobilisation and conscription drives’.

Russia tried to revive the training after the 2014 invasion of Crimea but it had little effect on the quality of conscripts.

He said the occupiers had ‘destroyed all critical infrastructure – communication, water supply, heat, electricity’.

Satellite images also show considerable damage to the nearby Nova Kakhovka dam amid fears about its structural integrity.

Mr Zelensky vowed: ‘We will restore everything, believe me, although it takes time.’ 

Ukrainian troops received a rapturous reception from residents as they entered Kherson, but the true toll of eight months of occupation has begun to emerge. 

Residents said they had been left without water and electricity for days and officials warned it is ‘a humanitarian catastrophe’.

The Russians even stole llamas, a racoon and wolves from a zoo.

Ukrainian police have warned refugees not to return to the city until it has been made safe after one officer was injured on Saturday while de-mining an administrative building. 

Police have set up checkpoints and there is a curfew in place from 5pm to 8am to stop anyone entering or leaving.

Kyiv claimed to have hit a building occupied by 500 Russian troops in a high-precision strike near the village of Dnipriany, about 30 miles east of Kherson. Ukrainian officials said the blast killed two truckloads of Russian troops.

While the liberation of the only regional capital taken by Russia marks a huge strategic victory for Ukraine, there is still a long road ahead. 

Now Russian troops have retreated to the relative safety of the eastern bank of the Dnipro River, it allows them to throw more men into their offensive in the Donbas, further north.

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