Study shows workers who quit their jobs regret leaving

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Why millions of Aussies who quit their jobs in the ‘Great Resignation’ now regret it – as careers expert reveals what you need to ask before going back

  • Study shows workers who left jobs during the ‘great resignation’ regret doing so
  • Australian career expert suggests what to do before quitting your job 
  • Sue Ellson also shared what to do if you want to return to a previous role 

Research shows the majority of workers who left their jobs during the phenomenon dubbed the ‘great resignation’ regret doing so.

A study by The Muse found a staggering 72 per cent of respondents surveyed experienced a ‘shift shock’ and wanted to go back to their previous positions.

Companies have been willing to take back previous employees who have jumped ship, but Melbourne author and LinkedIn specialist Sue Ellson said before resigning or returning to a previous employer, there’s a few important factors to consider.

‘When you are in a role, you may think that things ‘must be better elsewhere’ but often, they are just different! Some things will be better, other things may be worse,’ Ms Ellson told FEMAIL.

Before going back to a role, remember the reasons why you left. 

A study by The Muse found a staggering 72 per cent of respondents surveyed experienced a 'shift shock' and wanted to go back to their previous positions (careers expert Sue Ellson pictured)

A study by The Muse found a staggering 72 per cent of respondents surveyed experienced a ‘shift shock’ and wanted to go back to their previous positions (careers expert Sue Ellson pictured)

‘There is sometimes a case of ‘better the devil you know’ to staying in your own role – no job is ever 100 per cent aligned – but if you have 80 per cent, then that is fantastic,’ Ms Ellson said.

‘Going ‘back’ is not always going to be the best option as the process of leaving will change you in some ways.’

What’s more, consider what you’ll be returning to, who you’ll be working with and what benefits were provided – and more importantly, the work culture and salary.  

Ms Ellson said: ‘If you go back to the ‘same difficult boss’ and you haven’t developed your personal skills to cope with them, in a few months, you will be back in an awkward position, even if you have negotiated better benefits overall.’

And before quitting, workers should opt to take a 12 hour sabbatical away from all of their stress to give themselves enough time to ‘look at the situation clearly’. 

What should you do before you quit your job?

1. Remind yourself – add all of your experience and skills to your resume and LinkedIn Profile

2. Reflect – look at your overall career and life goals and what has been good and bad over the last five years 

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3. Research – look closely at what you could learn (short courses including personal skills not just technical skills), ask (seek unbiased professional guidance) and find (meaningful evidence)

4. Review – all your options (you may like to complete this process on a nice vacation) and consider what you can do part time to test the water

5. Ready – as best you can, make sure you take ongoing steps according to your bigger plan, knowing full well that each small step is a part of your progress (an ongoing coach or mentor may also be helpful)  

Source: Sue Ellson

LinkedIn specialist Sue Ellson said before resigning or returning to a previous employer, there's a few important factors to consider (stock image)

LinkedIn specialist Sue Ellson said before resigning or returning to a previous employer, there’s a few important factors to consider (stock image)

Ms Ellson said employees will benefit understanding your ‘values and purpose’ to help guide you into the right roles.

‘Sometimes a broader perspective of ALL components will only happen when you are rested and relaxed, not stressed and anxious. Good decisions are based on reliable facts and gut feel, not just intuition,’ she said.

‘Some people are naturally more resilient and looking for constant change and growth, others are more comfortable with gradual adjustments and consistency. Neither is wrong, but knowing how you operate is important.’

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