Prince William has spoken about ‘living life and something massively changes and you don’t have experience to tackle it’ during a discussion recorded with his wife Kate Middleton about mental health for BBC Radio 1.

The Prince of Wales appeared to have been referencing his mother Princess Diana’s death in 1997 and the recent deterioration of his relationship with brother Prince Harry during the discussion for World Mental Health Day.

The Prince and Princess of Wales spoke about the importance of mental health on the specially-recorded show for Newsbeat which will be aired on Radio 1, Radio 1Xtra and the Asian Network at 12.45pm this afternoon.

In a clip released ahead of the broadcast – which will be repeated on Radio 1 and 1Xtra at 5.45pm – the royal couple spoke about young people’s mental health with Newsbeat presenter Pria Rai and a host of advocates and experts.

William, 40, said: ‘A lot of the work we’ve done on mental health and listening to lots of people talk about it, everyone likes a toolbox – particularly men. A toolbox is quite a useful analogy to kind of use. A lot of people don’t realise what they need until it actually comes along. You can be living one life one minute and something massively changes and you realise you don’t necessarily have the tools or the experience to be able to tackle that.’

The Prince and Princess of Wales pictured with Emma Hardwell, Ben Cowley, Antonio Ferreria, Dr Abigail Miranda and Pria Rai in a photograph taken to mark their special programme for BBC Radio 1’s Newsbeat for World Mental Health Day yesterday

Dr Abigail Miranda, an educational and child psychologist working in early years, replied: ‘To have, I suppose, in your toolbox, communication would be key and I suppose some of the myth-busting as well around attachment.

‘We know now through studies that actually any parent who spends a significant amount of time – or any caregiver – with the child will also form similar attachments and have those similar patterns as well.’

Kate – dressed in a £49.99 recycled Zara blazer and a glitzy gold chain, thought to be the £234 Luisa Necklace from Laura Lombardi – then said she would ‘love to know’ how the contributors look after their own mental health.

Antonio Ferreira, a mental health activist who was diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia and emotionally unstable personality disorder as a teenager, replied: ‘That’s a big question.

The Prince and Princess of Wales recorded a special programme for BBC Radio 1's Newsbeat to mark World Mental Health Day

The Prince and Princess of Wales recorded a special programme for BBC Radio 1’s Newsbeat to mark World Mental Health Day

‘I know not every day is going to be roses and sunflowers, you know, I know some days I’m going to have to push against the clouds to see that sun again and, you know, I know that you know when you have a bad day it doesn’t mean it will be a bad week or a bad month.

‘You know, you can’t always run away from the issue, sometimes you have to really face them and conquer them and so, you know, with practice there’s progress, and that’s, I guess, in a nutshell how… it was a big question!’

Kate replied: ‘There’s no right or wrong, that’s the thing as well. Different things will work for different people and it’s just sometimes trying isn’t it, as well.’

Mr Ferreira said: ‘That’s it, yeah,’ and Kate added: ‘Different methods, different opportunities that arise as well to help best support you.’

The Princess of Wales was dressed in a £49.99 recycled Zara blazer and a glitzy gold chain, thought to be the £234 Luisa Necklace from Laura Lombardi, for the discussion on BBC Radio 1's Newsbeat which is being broadcast this afternoon

The Princess of Wales was dressed in a £49.99 recycled Zara blazer and a glitzy gold chain, thought to be the £234 Luisa Necklace from Laura Lombardi, for the discussion on BBC Radio 1’s Newsbeat which is being broadcast this afternoon

Ben Cowley, a music therapist and assistant mental health adviser for the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, and Emma Hardwell, a youth participation officer at The Mix, which offers mental health support to the under-25s, also took part in the discussion.

Aled Haydn Jones, head of Radio 1, said: ‘It’s been fantastic to welcome The Prince and Princess of Wales back to our studios to discuss something that is so close to both their and our audience’s hearts. 

‘What was discussed today will resonate with so many of our listeners and it means so much to us that we can all work together to help tackle the stigma around this issue.’

Danielle Dwyer, editor of Radio 1’s Newsbeat, added: ‘We know mental health is really important to our listeners and we also know that when they’re struggling, they often turn to their friends.

‘Newsbeat isn’t just about delivering the news – we’re here to be a friend too, and a place our listeners can find support and advice when they need it.

Prince William suffered the trauma of losing his mother in 1997. He is pictured with his family in 1995 on his first day at Eton

Prince William suffered the trauma of losing his mother in 1997. He is pictured with his family in 1995 on his first day at Eton

William has also suffered a deterioration in his relationship with brother Prince Harry (pictured at the Queen's funeral procession on September 19)

William has also suffered a deterioration in his relationship with brother Prince Harry (pictured at the Queen’s funeral procession on September 19)

‘Talking about mental wellbeing without stigma or judgment is so key and its brilliant to welcome the Prince and Princess of Wales to our reporting team for the day, to join us in such a vital conversation.’

Ms Rai said: ”Let’s be honest, the news can be a heavy place. It’s felt like one ‘unprecedented’ thing after another. Be it Covid, the cost of living crisis or exam stresses, it can take a toll on your mental health. 

‘Newsbeat always wants to just let our listeners know, it’s okay – you’re not the only one feeling like that. People not only switch us on to get the news, but to share openly and frankly how they are feeling. 

‘That’s humbling; to be a trusted part of people’s lives enough that they can send us a text about feeling lonely, or having lost a loved one. We have total strangers speaking to each other on the radio who soon feel like familiar friends and that’s a really important, uplifting part of what we do.’

The programme will be broadcast at 12.45pm today on BBC Radio 1, Radio 1Xtra and the Asian Network. It will be broadcast again on Radio 1 and Radio 1Xtra at 5.45pm and will be available on BBC Sounds from 2pm



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