One Florida urologist known as the ‘Vasectomy King’ says men are rushing to get the procedure in light of the overturn of Roe v. Wade.  

Since the overturn of the 1973 case that guaranteed a right to abortion on June 24, Dr. Doug Stein has received 12 to 18 requests for vasectomies per day, in comparison to a previous four or five requests, he told The Washington Post. 

 ‘It was very noticeable Friday, and then the number that came in over the weekend was huge and the number that is still coming in far exceeds what we have experienced in the past,’ Stein said. 

He added, ‘many of the guys are saying that they have been thinking about a vasectomy for a while, and the Roe v. Wade decision was just that final factor that tipped them over the edge and made them submit the online registration.’ 

As men come flooding in for the procedure, Stein has found himself booked through the end of August. To accommodate the demand, he has opened more appointments. 

Stein’s colleague, Dr. John Curington, echoed that the overturn of Roe v. Wade has resulted in men, specifically under the age of 30, requesting the procedure more than before. 

‘I’d say at least 60 to 70 percent are mentioning the Supreme Court decision,’ Curington told The Washington Post.

Urologist Dr. John Curington said that requests for     vasectomies have increased due to the overturn of Roe v. Wade

The urologist said the overturn of Roe v. Wade has resulted in more men under the age of 30 requesting the procedure

Men have been willingly lining up to get the procedure in light of the overturn of the 1973 landmark, especially those living in states that outlawed abortions following the Supreme Court ruling 

The 6-3 ruling allowed for all 50 states to determine their own abortion laws – with some choosing the ban the procedure. 

Florida was one state that planned on halting abortions after the 15-week limit. The state abortion limit was temporarily barred by a judge on June 30, but could still come into effect. 

Thomas Figueroa, 27, knew that he never wanted children, when he finally decided to see Stein following the Supreme Court ruling. 

Figueroa, a Florida resident, scheduled his appointment for a vasectomy on Monday after pondering the possibility for a few years.

‘It is something I put on the back-burner of my mind until very recently, when the Supreme Court decision happened,’ Figueroa told The Washington Post. ‘That was basically the triggering factor right there. It pushed my mind to say: “Okay, I really do not want children. I’m going to get this vasectomy now.”‘

Eric Nisi, 29, also thought about the option of a vasectomy for years before the Supreme Court decision prompted him to finally pull the trigger on Tuesday, he told The Washington Post. 

Nisi rushed to do the procedure after worrying birth control might become limited or restricted in Florida for his girlfriend Amanda Omelian, 33, who is currently on two types of birth control. 

Urologists have also reported an increase in vasectomies in states without any abortion restrictions or limits

Urologists have also reported an increase in vasectomies in states without any abortion restrictions or limits

Urologists across the country also witnessed an increase in vasectomies after the Dobbs opinion leaked in early May, which was first reported by Politico

While abortion remains legal in California, Los Angeles Urologist Philip Werthman reported a ‘300 to 400 percent’ increase in consultations for the procedure, he told The Post. 

New York is also not implementing any restrictions in light of the Roe decision, but urologist Marc Goldstein says he is seeing more appointments for vasectomies compared to previous inquiries for vasectomy reversals. 

‘Now it’s the other way around,’ he told The Washington Post. ‘So it’s been a dramatic shift.’  

Goldstein said that other major world events have also caused an uptick in the procedure. He witnessed an increase in vasectomies after the 2008 Great Recession – when more people were facing financial distress. 

The COVID-19 pandemic also caused an increase in the procedure as more men worked remotely. 

Thirteen states were set to enforce abortion bans and restrictions if Roe. v. Wade was ever overturned. Other states, imposed new restrictions or bans that would go into effect shortly after the June 24 ruling

Thirteen states were set to enforce abortion bans and restrictions if Roe. v. Wade was ever overturned. Other states, imposed new restrictions or bans that would go into effect shortly after the June 24 ruling  

Following the Roe ruling, abortion was automatically outlawed in 18 US states as a result of ‘trigger laws’ and historic bans that were reenacted after the June 24 ruling. 

Thirteen states prepared these trigger laws in the event that Roe was ever overturned. 

These state include, Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Five other states banned abortions after historic laws were reenacted, including Michigan, Wisconsin, Alabama, Arizona, and West Virginia.

Other states, including Florida, Indiana, Montana, and Nebraska have either enforced plans or are working on plans to ban or restrict the procedure.

Abortion rights advocates haven’t allowed for states halting abortions to get off easy, as many rushed to their state courthouses to fight the bans. 

On Thursday, Kentucky and Florida were two of the latest states to be granted temporary restraining orders on their planned abortion bans and restrictions. 

Abortions will proceed in those states until final rulings are made. 

Abortion clinics in Ohio, Idaho, West Virginia, and Mississippi are also seeking to halt the state implemented bans.  



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