Loose Women’s Nadia Sawalha breaks down in tears after detailing ADHD diagnosis which has led to compulsive eating and having low-self esteem

Nadia Sawalha broke down in tears on Thursday’s Loose Women when she revealed she has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, (ADHD). 

ADHD is a mental health condition with symptoms that include trouble focusing, hyperactivity and impulsive behaviour.

Nadia, 58, burst into tears after viewers were shown a clip of her ADHD journey on the show. 

Tough time: Loose Women’s Nadia Sawalha broke down in tears after detailing her ADHD diagnosis on the show on Thursday which has led to compulsive eating and having low-self esteem

Speaking about her assessment, she said: ‘There’s so many things in my life I want to forgive myself for after having the diagnosis.

‘If you scratch the surface there’s low self-esteem, but I do an amazing job of holding myself up. Something I really struggle with is not being able to drive.

‘Compulsive eating is a big part of ADHD, you have an addictive personality. People with ADHA have a shorter life span.’

She said: 'Compulsive eating is a big part of ADHD, you have an addictive personality. People with ADHA have a shorter life span'

She said: ‘Compulsive eating is a big part of ADHD, you have an addictive personality. People with ADHA have a shorter life span’

But Nadia has said she is happy to now be receiving the right help and said: ‘I have started medication and I’m feeling so much better now.’

Her words come after Christine McGuinness has opened up about her own ADHD diagnosis which she got just months after she revealed she was ‘high up the spectrum’ for autism.

The 34-year-old, who is estranged from her comedian husband Paddy McGuinness, 48, said she found her diagnosis liberating as it has set her on the path to understanding herself better.

Getting what she needs: But Nadia has said she is happy to now be receiving the right help and said: 'I have started medication and I'm feeling so much better now'

Getting what she needs: But Nadia has said she is happy to now be receiving the right help and said: ‘I have started medication and I’m feeling so much better now’

She told the Daily Star Sunday at the time: ‘I’ve now been diagnosed with ADHD, autism and dyspraxia.

‘Knowledge is key. If you know the situation, you’re able to deal with it. So getting a diagnosis has really opened up my life. 

‘It’s given me so much more opportunity to understand why I was the way I was.’

Christine’s three children, twins Penelope and Leo, eight, and five-year-old Felicity, have all been diagnosed with autism.

Health: Christine McGuinness, 34, has also been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder just months after she revealed she was "high up the spectrum" for autism

Health: Christine McGuinness, 34, has also been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder just months after she revealed she was “high up the spectrum” for autism

Family: Christine's three children, twins Penelope and Leo, eight, and five-year-old Felicity, have all been diagnosed with autism, and Christine revealed she had autism in November

Family: Christine’s three children, twins Penelope and Leo, eight, and five-year-old Felicity, have all been diagnosed with autism, and Christine revealed she had autism in November

WHAT IS ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a behavioural condition defined by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

It affects around five per cent of children in the US. Some 3.6 per cent of boys and 0.85 per cent of girls suffer in the UK. 

Symptoms typically appear at an early age and become more noticeable as a child grows. These can also include:

  • Constant fidgeting 
  • Poor concentration
  • Excessive movement or talking
  • Acting without thinking
  • Little or no sense of danger 
  • Careless mistakes
  • Forgetfulness 
  • Difficulty organising tasks
  • Inability to listen or carry out instructions 

Most cases are diagnosed between six and 12 years old. Adults can also suffer, but there is less research into this.

ADHD’s exact cause is unclear but is thought to involve genetic mutations that affect a person’s brain function and structure.

Premature babies and those with epilepsy or brain damage are more at risk. 

ADHD is also linked to anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette’s and epilepsy.  

There is no cure. 

A combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended to relieve symptoms and make day-to-day life easier. 

Source: NHS Choices 

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