Kremlin spreads fake BBC news report blaming Ukraine for missile attack on refugees at railway station

  • Fake BBC clip making out Ukraine was behind missile attack spread by Kremlin
  • Yesterday broadcaster urged people to ignore the video, which uses their logo
  • Footage has subsequently aired on Russian state television and social media 

A fake BBC News report making out Ukraine was behind a deadly missile attack on its own people has been spread online by pro-Russian sources.

Yesterday the broadcaster urged people to ignore the video, which uses the corporation’s logo and same red and white coloured graphics.

The clip gives the false impression that Ukrainian armed forces were responsible for a missile attack on refugees at a railway station in Kramatorsk, eastern Ukraine, on Friday.

The strike killed 57 people, including a number of children.

The footage, which reportedly originated among pro-Kremlin accounts, has subsequently aired on Russian state television and has been shared across social media.

The aftermath of Russia’s attack on on Kramatorsk’s station in Ukraine earlier this month. Russian soldiers wrote a chilling message of revenge on the missile (pictured being inspected by Ukrainian investigators) that killed at least 39 people – including four children – and wounded 87 when two strikes hit a railway station in east Ukraine today, as thousands of desperate evacuees tried reach safer parts of the country 

A view of people's belongings and bloodstains on the ground after a missile strike on a railway station in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, in this picture uploaded on April 8, 2022

A view of people’s belongings and bloodstains on the ground after a missile strike on a railway station in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, in this picture uploaded on April 8, 2022

The BBC press office said: ‘We are aware of a fake video with BBC News branding suggesting Ukraine was responsible for last week’s missile attack on Kramatorsk train station.

‘The BBC is taking action to have the video removed. We urge people not to share it and to check stories on the BBC News website.’ 

The one minute and 27 second-long video shows a BBC-style explainer saying the missile serial number was similar to those fired by the Ukrainian army.

Underneath the text is graphic clips of bodies covering the ground in the aftermath of the explosion along with footage of damaged tower blocks across Ukraine and the Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky walking with military personnel.

Pictured: Smoke rises from the station as firefighters work at the scene

Pictured: Smoke rises from the station as firefighters work at the scene

In another part of the video, the text refers to the Ukrainian president as “Zelenskyy”, but the BBC website spells his surname as “Zelensky”.

The fake video also claims that “military experts stress” that Ukraine is using “fake news to promote its position”.

Around 4,000 civilians were thought to be in and around the Kramatorsk railway station when a missile hit on Friday and 50 people were killed, according to Ukrainian authorities.

Photos from the scene showed bodies covered with tarpaulins on the ground and the remnants of a rocket with the words “For the children” painted on it in Russian.

The Russian Defence Ministry has denied that Russia was behind the attack.

President Zelensky and other Ukrainian leaders have accused Russia’s military of deliberately targeting a location where only civilians were assembled.

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