Florida’s top doctor says men aged 18-39 should NOT get a Covid vaccine

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Florida‘s top doctor has urged men aged 18 to 39 not to get a Covid vaccine, claiming the jab significantly raises their risk of dying from heart conditions.

Dr Joseph Ladapo, the state’s surgeon general, said the mRNA jabs raise the risk of cardiac-related death by 84 per cent in young males.

The vaccine-skeptic official cited a Florida Department of Health analysis to back up his claims — but independent scientists say it contains major statistical flaws.

In a tweet that was censored by Twitter over the weekend before being reposted, Dr Ladapo said Florida would ‘not be silent on the truth’.

He now becomes the most high-profile US doctor to break ranks from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), who says the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are safe for the vast majority of healthy children and adults. 

The CDC recognizes the vaccines in rare cases can cause myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart muscle, but believes the benefit of protecting against Covid outweighs the risk. 

Several studies have indicated the virus is more likely to cause heart problems than vaccines, which makes the argument even more nuanced.

But in recent months, as Covid death rates have trended downwards, several countries have changed their stance. 

Denmark and Norway have already banned Covid vaccines for non-seniors, while next month Sweden says it will stop recommending them for 12 to 17-year-olds.

Covid jabs are credited with saving more than 300,000 lives just in 2021, according to official analysis.

But the CDC’s rollout of bivalent booster vaccines this winter has been sluggish with just five per cent — or 11million people — of those eligible coming forward despite the Federal Government spending $5billion for the jabs.

Florida’s top doctor says men aged 18-39 should NOT get a Covid vaccine

Dr Joseph Ladapo, Florida’s top doctor issued the warning over the Covid jabs this weekend. He is pictured above before signing a bill by Florida’s Governor Ron DeSantis in 2021

The above is based on the Florida Department of Health's own analysis. It shows the risk of suffering a heart attack after getting the jab by age group and gender. It was calculated by comparing the fatality rate from the heart conditions a month after getting the vaccine, to that between one and five months later

The above is based on the Florida Department of Health’s own analysis. It shows the risk of suffering a heart attack after getting the jab by age group and gender. It was calculated by comparing the fatality rate from the heart conditions a month after getting the vaccine, to that between one and five months later

The graph shows the number of updated Pfizer and Moderna shots in vaccine clinics

The graph shows the number of updated Pfizer and Moderna shots in vaccine clinics 

Independent scientists have criticized the Florida paper cited by Dr Ladapo, describing its methodology as ‘incredibly flawed’.

One of the main problems is that it does not weed out people who tested positive for Covid — which itself can cause heart inflammation and other issues.

Revealing the controversial analysis on Friday, Dr Ladapo said it was ‘important’ that the risks of jabs were communicated to Floridians.

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‘Studying the safety and efficacy of any medications, including vaccines, is an important component of public health,’ he said.

‘Far less attention has been paid to safety and the concerns of many individuals have been dismissed.’

Up to one in 7,000 American teens suffered heart inflammation after their Covid vaccine 

Thousands of American teenagers may have suffered heart inflammation after getting a Covid jab, a study suggests.

Researchers found up to one in 7,000 boys aged 12 to 15 years old developed myocarditis after receiving the Pfizer vaccine.

The condition — which is mild for most but can cause a recurrent heart palpitation in rare cases — was most common after the second dose.

Covid is also mild for most teenagers with only 1,745 Americans under-18 dying from the disease compared to more than 800,000 over-50s.

Experts said their paper was not proof people should stop being vaccinated, adding the benefits still ‘greatly outweigh’ the risks.

Covid itself is known to cause myocarditis, with some studies known it is more common from infections than after an inoculation.

Vaccinating children has been hugely contentious during the pandemic because of the smaller risks Covid poses to them compared to older adults.

The Florida Department of Health published the eight-page document on Friday that was not peer-reviewed and had no authors mentioned.

It included 3,400 fatalities in the state from heart conditions over five months.

The authors conducted a self-controlled case series, meaning they looked at people who had died of any cause (except Covid).

They compared their risk of dying in the 28 days after getting their last Covid vaccine to their risk over the six month follow-up period.

They found in the 28 days after getting an inoculation people were less likely to die of any cause.

But most, especially young men, were more likely to die of a ‘cardiac-related’ cause such as a heart attack.

The Florida Department of Health said their analysis suggested an 84 per cent higher risk of death from myocarditis among men aged 18 to 39 years.

There were 20 fatalities in the first month, they said, compared to 52 over the next four months.

For comparison among women they said the risk was 59 per cent higher. This was based on 10 fatalities in the first month compared to 33 in the other.

Many scientists have been quick to blast the analysis as making ‘little to no sense’.

Dr Deepti Gurdasani, an ardent Covid vaccine supporter at Queen Mary University of London in the UK, slammed it as ‘incredibly flawed’.

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‘This study tells us nothing about the risks or benefits’, she said in a Tweet.

‘Vaccines have saved millions of lives, and are continuing to. Do they have side effects? — yes, they are rare, but they do happen. It’s a benefit-risk calculation.’

The analysis has no listed authors online and has not been peer-reviewed by scientists, a benchmark for ensuring quality research.

It also used the ICD-10 codes from I30 to I52 to catch fatalities from heart attacks, myocarditis and other conditions.

Many doctors warn this is a bucket area often used for billing purposes.

There is also no evidence that the deaths recorded under this code were actually due to the mRNA Covid vaccine. They may be down to another factor like the virus itself or an underlying health condition.

The analysis also saw people who died within the first month included in the analysis from one to five months later as though they were still alive.

Myocarditis and pericarditis are both known side-effects of the Pfizer and Moderna mRNA jabs, and particularly in young men.

Just last week a paper from healthcare provider Kaiser Permanente found up to one in 15,000 men aged 18 to 29 suffered myocarditis after a Covid booster vaccine. For comparison, among women of the same age group the rate was one in 156,000.

Most cases are mild however and normally clear up on their own, with few leading to medical treatment.

Pictured above is the tweet announcing the study. It was initially blocked by Twitter on Friday, but was restored on Sunday without any warnings

Pictured above is the tweet announcing the study. It was initially blocked by Twitter on Friday, but was restored on Sunday without any warnings

There are mounting concerns that the US may soon face another Covid wave after cases began to tick up in Europe. Pictured above is the daily case count for America

There are mounting concerns that the US may soon face another Covid wave after cases began to tick up in Europe. Pictured above is the daily case count for America

The CDC is currently rolling out updated bivalent boosters — which target Covid variants BA.4 and BA.5 — to all adults aged over 12 years old, but is particularly targeting to over-65s who are most at risk.

Some scientists have warned, however, that younger adults should avoid getting these bivalent booster vaccines until more data becomes available.

Dr Paul Offit — a top vaccines adviser on the CDC jabs committee — said it would ‘be wise’ to focus on older generations only for the jabs earlier this month.

‘We should be careful about overselling the bivalent vaccine as something better than the existing vaccine until more data are available,’ he said.

The Australian department of health warns the risk of myocarditis after the bivalent jab is similar to that from the second or booster doses.

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Both Denmark and Norway have suspended Covid vaccinations for healthy under-50s and under-65s respectively because of the low risk that either group will suffer serious illness or hospitalization from the disease.

At the start of November, Sweden says it will also stop recommending the jabs for healthy young adults because of the low risk they face.

Dr Ladapo’s tweets were initially blocked by Twitter as ‘misinformation’, but were restored on Sunday without any warnings.

It is not the first time the top doctor has raised concerns over the Covid vaccines.

This year Florida was also the only state to refuse to preorder any Covid vaccines for children from six months old, after they were approved for jabs by the CDC.

Officials signed off on jabs for this age group in order to give parents the choice, although they warned they should not disrupt standard scheduled inoculations for other diseases including measles, mumps and rubella.

About 68 per cent of Americans have got both doses of the initial Covid vaccines, official data shows.

But around 40 per cent have got their initial booster doses.

Broken down by age, data shows 71 per cent of over-65s came forward for the top-up shot owing to the high risk they face.

But among 18 to 24 year olds just 34 per cent came forward for the shots, while for 25 to 49 year olds 41 per cent got the extra inoculation. 

Even though the latest updated jabs began to be rolled out in early September, data shows that less than four per cent of those eligible have come forward for the shots.

Analysis suggests that the initial vaccine course has saved up to 300,000 lives among seniors — who are most at risk from the virus — in America alone.

And the US booster drive saved another 90,000 lives.

Concerns have been raised, however, over rolling out jabs to children as young as six months old.

Many experts has warned there is precious little evidence the age group — which is least at risk of serious disease or death from the virus — would benefit from the shots.

On the other hand there are also signs they may face a higher risk of myocarditis or pericarditis as a result of the shots.

Studies also suggest 86 per cent of children in America now have Covid fighting antibodies — mostly acquired via natural infection — meaning vaccines are only topping up existing immunity.

Other countries have avoided rolling out jabs to the youngest age groups because of the low risk they face.

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