[ad_1]

Charles Bronson today told a panel ‘We all love a bet, guv’ after they heard evidence of his attempt to gamble from behind bars – as ‘Britain’s most violent prisoner’ launched another bid for freedom. 

The Parole Board review of one of the UK’s longest-serving prisoners to decide whether he should remain behind bars began this morning, making him the second inmate in UK legal history to have his case heard in public.

Members of the press and public are watching the proceedings – taking place in HMP Woodhill in Milton Keynes – on a live stream from the Royal Courts of Justice in central London.

Dubbed one of Britain’s most violent offenders, Bronson – who changed his surname to Salvador in 2014 after the artist Salvador Dali – appeared on camera sat opposite a panel of parole judges wearing a black suit, white shirt and dark glasses. 

When asked if he wished to give evidence at the hearing, the 70-year-old said: ‘Oh yes, certainly.’

The last picture of Bronson in prison, with his son George Bamby-Salvador, a paparazzi photographer

The last picture of Bronson in prison, with his son George Bamby-Salvador, a paparazzi photographer 

A supporter of the notorious prisoner outside the Royal Courts of Justice today

A supporter of the notorious prisoner outside the Royal Courts of Justice today 

 When the hearing was told that Bronson had tried to get someone outside prison to place a bet for him, he told the panel: ‘We all love a bet, guv, come on.’

He then repeatedly said: ‘I’m getting bored of this’, objecting to his legal representative asking for a break before he gave evidence.

Bronson could be heard asking the lawyer ‘Can’t you just go yourself?’, before telling the chairman: ‘He just wants the toilet.’ 

Outlining Bronson’s criminal history as the hearing opened, the chairman of the Parole Board panel – who was not publicly named – said Bronson has spent most of the past 48 years behind bars, apart from two brief periods of freedom where he reoffended.

In a Channel 4 programme which aired last week, Bronson said he can ‘smell and taste freedom’ ahead of the parole hearing.

The parole panel chairman told the hearing: ‘The panel has not seen that documentary.’

But Bronson replied: ‘I find that hard to believe.’

Today’s hearing heard Bronson is prone to verbal outbursts, including one occasion where he had complimented a nurse on her top and touched her shirt, asking if it was silk.

The staff member told him it made her feel uncomfortable and he told her to f*** off, the hearing was told.   

Charles Bronson leaving the High Court in London, May 3, 2001, is now bidding for parole

Charles Bronson leaving the High Court in London, May 3, 2001, is now bidding for parole

On another occasion on August 19 last year when he was told that the deputy governor was visiting his cell, he said: ‘What, do you want me to put my party hat on?’ and told them to leave.

Bronson let out loud sighs at points as the prison offender manager gave evidence.

The prison worker said there were some security concerns around him courting media attention.

They said that he has regular phone contact with his son and friends, and has got back in touch with his mother.

Bronson could also be heard frequently swearing and sighing loudly as the hearing the began.

At one point he muttered ‘f****** hell’ under his breath as the review heard how submissions on behalf of Justice Secretary Dominic Raab had been delayed and could not be provided in advance of the proceedings to the parole board as a result. A representative for Mr Raab who was present at the hearing apologised for the delays.

When the hearing was told that Bronson had tried to get someone outside prison to place a bet for him, he told the panel: ‘We all love a bet, guv, come on.’

Bronson in a previous court sketch by the artist Elizabeth Cook

Bronson in a previous court sketch by the artist Elizabeth Cook 

If he does leave prison, Bronson says he plans to retire to the countryside to paint

The criminal attacked and kidnapped prison art teacher Phil Danielson in 1999 and was sentenced to life in 2000

He then repeatedly said: ‘I’m getting bored of this’, objecting to his legal representative asking for a break before he gave evidence.

Bronson could be heard asking the lawyer ‘Can’t you just go yourself?’, before telling the chairman: ‘He just wants the toilet.’

On the sometimes grainy live stream footage Bronson, who had been sipping what appeared to be a small carton of juice through a straw, was seen briefly standing up during the hearing and began asking for a tissue.

‘I haven’t p****d myself,’ he told the hearing as he placed the tissue under the juice carton and sat back down.

Amid long pauses while the panel asked his prisoner offender manager questions, Bronson said: ‘We will be here all f****** day, won’t we?’

How Charles Bronson became Britain’s most notorious prisoner: The ‘gentle and mild-mannered’ child who turned to life of crime, was convicted of armed robbery, married three times and has spent half a century behind bars 

By Dan Sales for MailOnline

The man dubbed ‘Britain’s most dangerous prisoner’ was originally known as Michael Gordon Peterson and was born in Luton, Bedfordshire, in 1952.

See also  Inside Bruce Willis' blended family as he battles brain condition: Ex Demi and current wife Emma

In fact Charles Bronson’s aunt once claimed he had wanted to protect others, insisting he was: ‘Gentle and mild-mannered, never a bully; he would defend the weak.’

But from a young age Bronson indulged in petty crime, joining a gang of four robbers at the age of 13.

He is known to have worked a two-week stint in Tesco but was sacked for attacking his manager. 

Then he was given a number of suspended sentences and reprimands for low-level offences until he was first sent to jail for armed robbery in 1974 for seven years aged 22.

In an interview in 2021 he revealed the best piece of advice he had ever been given – which goes some way to explain his subsequent life of violence.

Bronson admitted: ‘That’s got to be my dad who told me, ‘Whenever there’s a bit of trouble, son, always get the first punch in’.

Charles Bronson, armed robber, who has been called Britain's most dangerous prisoner

Charles Bronson, armed robber, who has been called Britain’s most dangerous prisoner

Brinson memorably described the notorious Kray twins as ‘the best two guys I’ve ever met’

‘Done me proud that has. Yeah, get the first one in and hope for the best – I’ve lived by that, it’s got me through some crazy times.’

And while in Walton Gaol, he randomly attacked two prisoners and was sent to Hull the following year.

In the next few years, Bronson continued to attack other inmates, adding months to his sentence and being switched between prisons.

At HMP Wandsworth, he tried to poison another prisoner, leading to him being sent to Parkhurst psychiatric facility where he befriended the infamous Kray twins. 

The parole board confirmed that Charles Bronson's hearing is set for March 6 and March 8, and said that reviews are undertaken thoroughly and with extreme care

 The parole board confirmed that Charles Bronson’s hearing is set for March 6 and March 8, and said that reviews are undertaken thoroughly and with extreme care

Bronson, pictured on his way to a parole hearing at the Old Bailey in 2004, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974

Bronson, pictured on his way to a parole hearing at the Old Bailey in 2004, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974

He even described the pair, who ruled the East End of London with their gang during the 1950s and 1960s, as ‘the best two guys I’ve ever met’.

Again, he continued to attack other prisoners, threaten police officers, took people hostage and even attempted suicide as he was moved from prison to prison.

In 1982, he performed a rooftop protest at Broadmoor, removing tiles from the top of the building. He took part in a number of protests over the years, causing hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of damage.

See also  Rishi Sunak arrives in Kyiv on his first visit to Ukraine since becoming Prime Minister 

He was released in 1987, and began boxing in the East End of London, changing his name to Charles Bronson after the actor.

Phil Danielson, who Bronson took hostage, has said the incident permanently affected his life

Phil Danielson, who Bronson took hostage, has said the incident permanently affected his life 

After just 69 days of freedom, he was once again jailed for armed robbery for seven years in 1988. 

In 1989, he created a spear out of a broken bottle and a broom handle and ran riot in the nude. 

Three years later, he was released – this time lasting 53 days outside jail. He was arrested for conspiracy to rob.

In 1993, he took a librarian hostage and asked police to get him a cup of tea, a helicopter, and an inflatable doll.

Three years later, he took two Iraqi prisoners hostage in Belmarsh, demanding a plane, sub-machine guns and ice cream from police negotiators before releasing them.

He was handed a life sentence in 1999 for taking Phil Danielson hostage and trashing the prison in a 44-hour long siege.  

In 2001, he married Fatema Saira Rehman, and converted to Islam, demanding to be known as Charles Ali Ahmed. After they divorced four years later, he renounced the religion.

In 2014, he changed his name to Charles Salvador, after Salvador Dali.  

Bronson and Paula Williamson met in 2016, and Bronson later proposed to her in 2017 by serenading her a version of the Frank Sinatra classic My Way, from a prison pay phone

Bronson and Paula Williamson met in 2016, and Bronson later proposed to her in 2017 by serenading her a version of the Frank Sinatra classic My Way, from a prison pay phone

Bronson and Paula Williamson met in 2016, and Bronson later proposed to her in 2017 by serenading her a version of the Frank Sinatra classic My Way, from a prison pay phone.

They married in November 2017, and walked down the aisle to the Death March. They had their marriage annulled in June 2019.

She was found dead at her home in Sneyd Green on July that year in her bedroom after taking drink and drugs.

In total, Bronson has taken hostages in ten prison sieges and attacked at least 20 prison officers. 

A public Parole Board hearing for him is due to take place this month.

It runs the real possibility he could be freed for the first time in decades.

The chance is a prospect he appears to savour, telling a Channel Four documentary: ‘I’m focused, I’m settled, I can actually smell and taste freedom like I’ve never, ever done in my life.

‘I’m now anti-crime, anti-violent. What the f**k am I still in prison for?’

Ms Williamson and Bronson married in November 2017, and walked down the aisle to the Death March

Ms Williamson and Bronson married in November 2017, and walked down the aisle to the Death March

[ad_2]

Source link