California has been hit with 78trillion gallons of water during this historic winter, which is enough to fill Lake Tahoe twice or 110million Olympic-sized pools. 

Statewide, residents have seen an average of nearly 28 inches of rainwater, as well as the snow-water equivalent – the amount of rainwater it would amount too if it wasn’t solid – between October 1 to March 20. 

Despite the amount of water being able to fill the Rose Bowl 900,000 times, it is not the wettest winter season California has ever seen. The Golden State saw the most rain between 1982 and 1983 with an average of 42.81 inches, according to California state climatologist Michael Anderson. 

However, it is roughly 25trillion more gallons than the yearly average of 52trillion, or 18.6 inches.  

In addition, some of the higher elevation cities have gotten around an average of 58feet of snow, or roughly 700 inches, according to USA Today

California has been hit with 78trillion galloons of water during this historic winter, which is enough to fill Lake Tahoe twice or 110million Olympic sized pools (pictured: Kernville on March 10)

California has been hit with 78trillion galloons of water during this historic winter, which is enough to fill Lake Tahoe twice or 110million Olympic sized pools (pictured: Kernville on March 10) 

Statewide, residents have seen an average of nearly 28 inches of rainwater, as well as the snow-water equivalent between October 1 to March 20 (pictured: San Joaquin County on March 21)

Statewide, residents have seen an average of nearly 28 inches of rainwater, as well as the snow-water equivalent between October 1 to March 20 (pictured: San Joaquin County on March 21)

Despite the amount of water being able to fill the Rose Bowl 900,000 times, it is not the wettest winter season California has ever seen. The Golden State saw the most rain between 1982 and 1983 with an average of 42.81 inches (pictured: Pajaro on March 14)

Despite the amount of water being able to fill the Rose Bowl 900,000 times, it is not the wettest winter season California has ever seen. The Golden State saw the most rain between 1982 and 1983 with an average of 42.81 inches (pictured: Pajaro on March 14) 

San Francisco experienced hurricane force winds last week as the state has been battered by 12 atmospheric storms

San Francisco experienced hurricane force winds last week as the state has been battered by 12 atmospheric storms 

Weather.com meteorologist Chris Dolce said the amount of snow is equal to three giraffes stack on top of each other. 

The Central Sierra Snow Lab recorded 57feet of snow. The average is 30feet. 

The water content level of the Central Sierra snowpack is almost 235 percent over the April 1 average, according to the California Department of Water Resources. 

With all the extra rainfall from the 12 atmospheric storms that have slammed into the state and the extra snowfall, California has become less drought-stricken. In January, the Golden State was at a 100 percent drought level, whereas now, it is only at 36 percent, according to the US Drought Monitor

In addition, some of the higher elevation cities have gotten around an average of 58feet of snow, or roughly 700 inches, and have been surrounded by high snowbanks (pictured: Lake Tahoe)

In addition, some of the higher elevation cities have gotten around an average of 58feet of snow, or roughly 700 inches, and have been surrounded by high snowbanks (pictured: Lake Tahoe) 

The Central Sierra Snow Lab recorded 57feet of snow. The average is 30feet (pictured: Mammoth Lakes on March 29)

The Central Sierra Snow Lab recorded 57feet of snow. The average is 30feet (pictured: Mammoth Lakes on March 29) 

More snow is expected to hit the higher elevations, such as Mammoth Lakes, Wednesday through Friday

More snow is expected to hit the higher elevations, such as Mammoth Lakes, Wednesday through Friday 

‘Clearly, the amount of water that’s fallen this year has greatly alleviated the drought. It has not ended the drought completely, but we’re in a very different place than we were a year ago,’ UCLA Climate Scientist Daniel Swain said, according to USA Today. 

Earlier this month, Kernville was so heavily hit by flooding, video shows homes and playgrounds being surrounding by rushing water, while Lake Tahoe residents were stranded and surrounded by dense snowpack that reached their rooftops

San Francisco was battered with hurricane force winds that knocked out power for more than 230,000. At least one person died after the gusts – which reached upwards of 78mph – caused a tree to fall near Portolla Valley.

This week's storm could also bring more flooding to the state, which is still recovering from flooding (pictured: Corcoran on March 29)

This week’s storm could also bring more flooding to the state, which is still recovering from flooding (pictured: Corcoran on March 29)

A car braved the high waters in Corcoran on March 29

A car braved the high waters in Corcoran on March 29 

California is bracing once again for another storm, which is expected to roll in on Wednesday and last until Friday. 

It will largely affect higher elevation areas and could bring runoffs and excessive flooding. Snowfall in the Sierra Nevada could reach up to three feet. 

High winds are expected to effect much of California, Nevada, southern Oregon, and northwestern Arizona, according to NPR. The Northern Rockies can expect temperatures to be in the 30s and 40s, while the rest of California will be in the 50s. 

Due to excessive weather, Governor Gavin Newsom has requested presidential major disaster declaration. If accepted, it would help residents receive aide who are harmed by the storms. 



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