A five-week-old baby and a man were killed in a horrific crash after a mother led police on a high-speed chase after stealing baby products from a Louisiana Walmart

Edward Williams, of Monroe, and a five-week-old baby died after Candance Gill, 38, led police on a chase that ended up in two crumpled cars shortly after 6pm on Monday. 

Gill and Williams were reportedly confronted by security at a Walmart for stealing baby products. By the time police arrived to the scene, the couple had already fled in their vehicle. 

Gill’s silver Chevrolet Camaro was spotted speeding down a highway by witnesses. 

An ‘officer pursued and activated his lights and sirens, but the vehicle failed to stop,’ the police report, obtained by KNOE, said. 

She reportedly drove on the shoulder of the road and ran several red lights shortly before crashing into another vehicle near Highway 165 and Renwick Street. 

Gill fled the scene and was later found at an Otis Street residence. She was booked into Ouachita Correctional Center with a $271,950 bond. 

The mother was charged with two counts of manslaughter, four counts of negligent injury, one count of shoplifting, four counts of failing to appear for a bench warrant, two counts of not using a seatbelt, possession of a firearm by a person convicted of a felony, and more, according to her booking information

Candance Gill, 38, was booked into the Ouachita Correctional Center with a $271,950 bond and charged with two counts of manslaughter after she reportedly stole baby products from a Walmart and led police on a chase. It is unclear what she reportedly stole 

Gill (pictured) and Edwards reportedly approached by Walmart security about the reported theft, but they escaped and fled in a car, where they were later spotted speeding down the highway before crashing

Gill (pictured) and Edwards reportedly approached by Walmart security about the reported theft, but they escaped and fled in a car, where they were later spotted speeding down the highway before crashing 

Gill's car was seen with the hood crunched up (pictured) after the serious crash. Gill managed to escape from the crash and was later arrested at an Otis Street residence. Williams was pronounced dead at the scene and the child suffered significant injuries and died at the hospital

Gill’s car was seen with the hood crunched up (pictured) after the serious crash. Gill managed to escape from the crash and was later arrested at an Otis Street residence. Williams was pronounced dead at the scene and the child suffered significant injuries and died at the hospital

Williams was pronounced dead at the scene and the baby was taken to the hospital with serious injuries, and later died.  

‘The Monroe Police Department believes the child was not properly restrained in the vehicle prior to the crash,’ police reported.  

The two passengers in the other car reportedly suffered from non-life-threatening injuries, police said. 

It is unclear what baby items Gill and Williams stole from the store, but it comes as parents are facing a baby food shortage, where the south is being hit the hardest. 

Parents in Tennessee are the hardest-hit by the baby formula shortage, new data obtained by DailyMail.com shows – with those in Joe Biden’s home state of Delaware coming a close second.

The scale of the crisis is revealed in the new analysis, which shows that only 43 percent of the usual national supply of baby formula is available.

In Tennessee, 54 percent of the state’s usual supply is out of stock, in Delaware the figure is 54 percent and in Texas it is 52 percent.

The situation this week is likely to be significantly worse, as parents panic-buy supplies and yet more stores run out of the products.

The passengers in the other car (pictured) reportedly suffered non-life-threatening injuries

The passengers in the other car (pictured) reportedly suffered non-life-threatening injuries 

The problem began earlier this year, when a Michigan-based factory was found to have flouted Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hygiene procedures, and four babies were hospitalized after eating contaminated formula, with one dying.

As the shortage continues – and is estimated to last all year – the Louisiana Department of Health advises parents to be careful about choosing substitutes at random. 

‘We understand the frustration families are feeling if they’re not able to find a brand their baby has become accustomed to, but it is very important that we focus during this shortage on keeping babies well-fed with appropriate substitutes,’ Jennifer Nicklas, the Director of LDH’s Bureau of Nutrition Services, said in a statement. 

‘Families should not substitute cow’s milk, goat’s milk or plant-based milk for infant formula, or water their formula down. Families with questions about other substitutes should contact their pediatrician.’ 

The department also advises against hoarding baby food and only keep a 10-day supply and to not make homemade formula, as it won’t contain the nutrition babies need.  



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