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Army veteran is left furious at Carvana after $68k Maserati he bought for his wife is confiscated by cops after mechanic discovered it was stolen and three years older than he thought

  • Jason Scott scammed out of $68,000 after buying second-hand car from Carvana
  • Vehicle has since been seized by police and Scott struggled to secure compensation from the retailer
  • Carvana is facing multiple legal challenges which are mostly to do with how it handles vehicle inspection paperwork

An Army veteran has revealed he was scammed out of $68,000 after buying a second-hand car which turned out to be stolen.

Jason Scott was looking to surprise his wife with the 2021 Maserati SUV which had been falsely advertised on second-hand car site Carvana back in November.

But when the couple took their car to be serviced at a local Maserati dealership in February – just four months after buying it – they learnt it had been stolen. 

Carvana said the case was a rare incident of a ‘sophisticated’ scam.

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Scott, from Moore County, North Carolina, told WTVD: ‘It was exciting for it to be coming down the hill, waiting for it outside, everything was fine.’

Jason Scott was looking to surprise his wife with the 2021 Maserati SUV which had been falsely advertised on second-hand car site Carvana back in November

Jason Scott was looking to surprise his wife with the 2021 Maserati SUV which had been falsely advertised on second-hand car site Carvana back in November

However after mechanics inspected the vehicle they informed him of the problem.

‘That’s when they found out that the vehicle was stolen,’ he said. 

 ‘When they check the VIN number on the chassis, that’s when they saw that it was a stolen vehicle. VIN on the car, on the window, and the car door was different.’

Police seized and impounded the vehicle, WTVD reported. 

However when he tried to seek compensation from a Carvana representative they refused.

‘She said well, we can’t trade the vehicle back in until you bring the vehicle back. I said I can’t bring the vehicle back. I said the police have the vehicle,’ Scott said. 

Scott is seeking $1 million compensation from the second-hand site for financial and reputational losses. 

The company reportedly denies any knowledge the vehicle was stolen and has apologized. 

It is now working with Scott to refund the money he spent on the purchase or be handed a new vehicle in return. 

Scott, from Moore County, North Carolina , told WTVD : 'It was exciting for it to be coming down the hill, waiting for it outside, everything was fine.'

Scott, from Moore County, North Carolina , told WTVD : ‘It was exciting for it to be coming down the hill, waiting for it outside, everything was fine.’

But Scott is demanding the company put better security checks in place to make sure it doesn’t happen to another customer. 

‘I know they say they have 150-point inspections. I want them to have 151. Check to see if the vehicle is stolen,’ he said. 

‘The last thing I want anybody to do is to get caught late at night on some strange road in the backcountry and they can’t verify it and they look at that person as a criminal.’

A Carvana spokesman told Dailymail.com: ‘This is a sophisticated criminal act and we’re taking all the necessary steps to make it right for our customer in this rare instance.’ 

Caravana celebrated its ten-year anniversary last month. 

It is marketed on its optimum convenience as it allows customers to buy cars entirely over the internet. 

Multiple legal challenges, including a class-action lawsuit in North Carolina, were brought against Carvana last year.

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